Te Kete Ipurangi Navigation:

Te Kete Ipurangi
Communities
Schools

Te Kete Ipurangi user options:


Supporting Māori students through ako-e (e-learning)

How can e-learning make a difference to ākonga Māori?

For ākonga Māori, e-learning can:

  • offer flexible, inclusive learning opportunities – they can stay in more familiar social and cultural environments while pursuing continued and enhanced learning 
  • support communities to reconnect and learn their language and customs through the development and production of online learning resources 
  • create opportunities to engage with their cultural knowledge forms and practices.

Tiakiwai & Tiakiwai, 2010

Student at laptop

Successful learning for ākonga Māori is founded on language, culture, and values. It builds on what we know to be effective curriculum and pedagogy in that cultural context. e-Learning approaches that are successful for Māori students work "within a Māori framework that emphasises and values" (NZCER, 2004 ).

  • Create learning environments that are fit for purpose in the 21st century, which allow diverse learners more opportunities to stay engaged and achieve. 
  • Have high expectations for every learner. 
  • Know your students and apply that knowledge of their background, identity, language, and culture into what and how you teach, so they can "...participate in engaging, inclusive, and culturally responsive teaching and learning environments..."

Te Mārautanga o Aotearoa  reminds us,

Te whanake o te ako-e

Ko te ako-e ko ngā akoranga ka whakatenatenatia, ka tautokona rānei mā ngā hangarau mōhiohio me ngā hangarau whakawhitiwhiti. He tino tikanga tā te hangarau mōhiohio mō tēnei tipuranga, nā reira he pai tēnei momo ako ki a rātou. Mā te ako-e:

Ka māmā te kimi mātauranga i Aotearoa, i te ao whānui, me te noho tonu i te kura, i te kāinga rānei.
Ka ako tahi ngā ākonga, ngā hapori.
Ka uru atu te ākonga ki ngā wheako rerekē, ki ngā wheako kei tua atu i te kura, i te kāinga hoki.

The development of e-learning:

e-Learning is learning that is encouraged and supported by information technology and communication technology. Information technology is critical to this generation and is an effective means of teaching and learning. e-Learning allows:

  • easy access to knowledge in New Zealand and the wider world from the school or home
  • the learner and community to learn together
  • the learner to have varied experiences, and experiences beyond the school and home.
Key resources

Teachers as learners: Improving outcomes for Māori and Pasifika students through inquiry
These learning materials illustrate how teachers have used an inquiry approach to teaching to become more culturally responsive and to improve outcomes for their Māori and Pasifika students.

Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success 2013–2017
The Government's strategy to rapidly change how education performs so that all Māori students gain the skills, qualifications, and knowledge they need to enjoy and achieve education success as Māori.

Tātaiako – Cultural competencies for teachers of Māori learners
The five dimensions will underpin and be woven through the design of what is learned (curriculum), how it is learned (pedagogy), why it is learned, and the way that ICT is integrated. This includes the way whānau and iwi are involved in the learning.

Where to start?

Get to know your Māori students and what is important to them. Start with students' culturally-located needs and strengths.

"Effective teaching and learning depends on the relationship between teachers and students and students' active enagagement."

Teachers from Pegasus Bay School discuss how students learning their pepeha, rakau games, waiata, and karakia has created a culturally responsive environment where tikanga Māori is celebrated and valued. Teachers work hard to connect with whānau. Student work is shared through classroom blogs. Teachers have organised workshops using parent and whānau expertise with harakeke weaving leading up to matariki. Feedback from whānau has been positive.

  • Create ongoing opportunities for students to share where they are from, what is important to them and why.
  • Provide students with the tools and supports they need to develop and share their mihi, supported by their whānau.

Students at Burnham School found the process of creating and sharing a mihi, which involved engaging with their families and the community to research into their past and using technology to share that with their parents/whānau for feedback, a valuable learning experience.

Creating a digital mihi

PowerPoint slides and teacher notes on how and why to create a digital mihi by Catriona Pene.

Russell Street School mihi
Russell Street School mihi

Russell Street School students share their pepeha and school mihi in this YouTube clip. This is an example of a simple way to utilise technologies so students can share their mihi.

See the Snapshots of learning tab for more examples

Susan Lee, teacher at Te Kura o Kutarere shares how using Storybird , a free digital story writing tool, in her classroom has made a significant impact on the literacy development of her students. She describes how students have become self motivated and proud of their work. Her curriculum decisions about narrative writing model ako driven by literacy data and information on achievement, rather than assumptions about what they can/can’t do. Conversations are located in the learning (wānanga). 

Planning is based on Susan knowing her learners and wrapping the learning design around who they are and where they are from. The literacy is grounded in local stories from Opotiki and the kura’s place-based curriculum. The student in the video clip makes these connections when he says, “It's about Māori people and dragons and stuff and yeah, it's Maui. He put on a meeting for all the people of Opotiki.”

This approach allows students to:

  • bring their prior knowledge (ako) 
  • work reciprocally, learning by modelling, watching, and doing

The technology (Storybird on laptops) supports the local focus, the reciprocal nature of the activity, and the different strengths and needs of the students.

Use local Māori contexts (such as whakapapa, environment, tikanga, language, history, place, economy, politics, local icons, geography) to support Māori learners’ learning. Integrate knowledge of local context, tikanga, history, and language – including the prior knowledge that ākonga bring with them.

Yvonne Nikora, Deputy principal at Waerenga o Kuri School describes her approach to creating a digital story with her students, focusing on their turangawaewae. Successful planning for learning is underpinned by Yvonne connecting with her students and building relationships so they can achieving success as Māori.

Key planning considerations included:

"This process has empowered our students."

  • finding out from students what they would like to look at
  • using a tuakana-teina approach to learning and teaching
  • providing choices for students
  • an authentic learning context, that had meaning for her students
  • utilising digital technologies to create and share their learning.  

Bringing cultural context into the curriculum affirms the students identity, validates their cultural knowledge, and knowledge of their whānau. It provides a relevance and immediacy, which motivates students.

The Māori Education Strategy: Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success 2013–2017

Te reo Māori is taught and used daily in the classrooms at Pegasus Bay School. Teachers agreed to plan 15 minute instructional lessons to make it manageable. They also include daily karakia, music, and games and identify features of their learning environment that reflect the culture of their learners and provide prompts to support using te reo Māori.

Teachers from Pegasus Bay School describe how they use digital technology to support the teaching of te reo Māori. In particular, they talk about the apps TellagamiExplain Everything , and Kahoot!

Use digital technologies to create a collaborative learning environment. Identify tools that enable students to share their learning with you, other students/akonga, parents, and whānau.

Teacher, Mihi Morunga, and students describe the process of creating iBooks and the benefits these have in the learning process. Students are reseraching, being creative, working using their own language, and sharing the knowledge they have made. Once completed students can share their books with whānau. Having work accessible online allows parents and whānau easy access to what their child is doing, and supports them with being involved in the learning.

Using digital technologies to support the teaching of te reo Māori

Teachers from Pegasus Bay School describe how they use digital technology to support the teaching of te reo Māori. In particular, they talk about the apps TellagamiExplain Everything , and Kahoot!

Improving student writing with digital stories

Bridget Harrison's class at Kimi Ora Community School is made up of 100% Māori and Pasifika students. Many of the students have English as a second language. In this clip she shares how they are using digital stories to scaffold the writing process. The success of this approach is reflected in their asTTle writing data showing students making a year's progress in two terms.

Teaching digital stories using tuakana-teina

Irongate School has a focus on improving student literacy levels particularly for their large population of Māori and Pasifika students. The tuakana-teina relationship, an integral part of traditional Māori society, provided the model for the buddy system they are using. The older or more expert tuakana (Year 5/6 students) help and guide the younger or less expert teina (new entrant students). Using Photostory, Year 5/6 students teach their younger student buddies the techniques involved in both creating and self monitoring their work. These stories are now reading material for the students.

Benefits of using technologies in the classroom

Teachers and students at Finlayson Park school share how using technologies is benefitting student learning in the classroom. They describe the flexibility it provides for learning and some of the websites they use for teaching te reo and tikanga Māori.

Paul and Shelley Cornwall describe the changes they made to their teaching approach at Motu School. The Māori achieving success as Māori (MASAM) document gave them a starting point. Taking an inclusive approach, considering students' cultural backgrounds, and incorporating te reo Māori across the school curriculum has impacted on student learning. They have used digital technologies to support learning and connect with parents. Their change in approach has given students ownership of their learning.

Find out more about Māori achieving success as Māori »

The Virtual Learning Network (VLN) Learning Exchange enables connections between teachers and learners; joining clusters, schools, groups and individuals who are learning through online and blended programes. The VLN promotes the concept of classrooms without walls, where learners and educators have the flexibility to connect with each other 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

The Learning Exchange comprises of five areas of collaboration: Programmes of learning, Projects, Professional learning, Participation, Parents & Whanau.

Students at Motu School are enrolled in the VLN Learning Exchange to support and deepen their learning in Māori language. Teachers explain why they chose the VLN to support student learning and Jermial, a student talks about what he is learning and the benefits for him.

Using technologies to engage parents in student learning

There has been recognition of the importance of reciprocal two-way communication to enhance the understanding of student backgrounds and learning needs; to consult with parents, whānau, and communities on school priorities; and to engage in collaborative goal setting.

Partners in learning: Schools’ engagement with parents, families, and communities in New Zealand

As a result of deliberately creating programmes where the parents can come and join in with their children’s learning, parents feel welcome and included in their child's education. Student, Herepo Wynyard talks about how the involvement of her whānau both online (through her e-portfolio) and face-to-face at school has encouraged success with her learning goals.

Examples of ways you can use technologies to support communication with parents and whānau

  • Leave computers on at the end of the day and invite parents and whānau to view students’ digital work
  • Find out the types of technology that parents and whānau use and share in those mediums.
  • Consider using multiple channels, such as mobile devices, email, instant messaging services, social media, and the school website, to connect with parents and whānau.
  • Provide deliberate support or training to show parents and whānau how they can engage with students’ work, both face-to-face and through technology.
  • Create and promote online spaces such as blogs that invite parent and whānau participation and feedback.
  • Establish a site or portal for parents and whānau to access and contribute to student learning.
  • Design e-portfolios to inform future steps in learning..

Dave McShane (principal), Susan Lee (teacher), and kaumatua from Te Kura o Kutarere discuss how technologies have helped to engage their local community to support and share students learning.

e-Portfolios and three-way student led conferences help parents to develop a deeper understanding of how their child is progressing and how they can support learning. 

  • Involve whānau in learning-focused discussions (wānanga). 
  • Actively engage Māori learners and whānau in the learning partnership through regular, purposeful feedback, and constructive feed-forward.

Parents willingly came into Motu School to help out with fundraising and sports activities. Setting up e-portfolios and making them part of three-way student led conferences enabled parents and whānau to engage directly with their children's learning. They have a deeper understanding of where their child is, what their learning goals are, and their next steps.  

Communicating learning at Hiruhama School
Learning at Hiruharama School

At Hiruharama School, the process of learning is expressly communicated to all the students. They are the primary communicators of their learning to whānau. Digital portfolios, created and maintained by students, are used to communicate that learning.

Review your school’s localised curriculum with parents and whānau.  

Ask:

  • Where are the voices of whānau in this curriculum?
  • How does the curriculum fit the students and the graduate profile? (or do they have to fit into it?).

The board of trustees, parent community, and school leadership team at Waerenga O Kuri School explain the collaborative process they used for developing their Māori achieving success as Māori (MASAM) framework. The result has been a real community partnership to include parents improve student learning outcomes in a culturally responsive and inclusive manner.

Parents, teachers, and the board of trustees at Waerenga o Kuri share their perspectives on the partnership that has been built based on the Māori achieving success as Māori (MASAM) framework they developed together. The school curriculum is very localised, flexible, and caters for the community.

  • Meet face-to-face to model particular strategies with parents, introduce a video to model a particular strategey or approach that can be re-watched.
  • Create opportunities where students can draw on the expertise and experience of their whānau and work together on a project, for example creating a mihi.
  • Maintain a class blog or weekly email to whānau, where you and students share the class learning, and encourage whānau to share their knowledge.

Sylvia Park School learning advisor, Ariana Williams explains the importance of connecting with parents to support student learning. She explains, "the purpose of Mutukaroa is to enable parents to understand the student assessments that we do at school. What used to happen is that parents didn’t use to see that sort of information, so our goal is to make sure that parents from Year 1 to 3 get to see every assessment that their child undertakes at school." More information about the Mutukaroa project  is in the Beyond the Classroom section of Enabling e-Learning.

More information and examples

"Having the kids learning on the marae, knowing their tikanga, their te reo, and using the iPads and bringing it into the school, into the home, I just find that really good for everyone."

Access and capture the expertise that Māori parents, whānau, hapū, and iwi offer. Connect with your local marae. See if you can use this as place to meet with parents, whānau, and the local community. When you engage with parents and the local community, find out how they would like to share their knowledge with students.

Teachers at Coastal Taranaki School setup Te ika unahi nui wānanga – A marae-based learning programme  with their local community. They met at their local marae. Parents and whānau shared their tikanga and te reo with students in an authentic context. Learning was hands-on and engaged the students. Students used iPads to record, process, and create stories about their learning to share with their parents and peers.

Te Ika Unahi Nui is a wānanga (learning) which is based at Puniho Pā, Tarawainuku marae in Okato Taranaki. The wānanga is a partnership between the marae, Coastal Taranaki School, and the local community. Facilitator, Jason Ruakere, students, and teacher, Chris Luke talk about the difference marae-based learning supported by digital technologies has made to students confidence and identity.

Relationships are at the heart of learning. These stories demonstrate how e-learning tools can be used to build relationships and engage with Māori learners, whānau, and iwi. e-Learning tools provide new opportunities and contexts for personalising learning with Māori learners to ensure they enjoy success as Māori.

Mutukaroa – Connecting with whānau

Mutukaroa – Connecting with whānau

Project coordinator Ariana Williams explains how and why Mutukaroa works, why it’s so important for parents to understand assessments, and the benefit for them of knowing how to support their child better at home.

A student’s perspective of inclusive education

Inclusion

Waerenga o Kuri student, Herepo Wynyard talks about how the involvement of her whānau both online (through her e-portfolio), and face-to-face at school has encouraged success with her learning goals.

MASAM supported by technology

MASAM supported by technology

Students and teachers at Motu School describe how the VLN Learning Exchange and digital technologies support Māori achieving success as Māori.

Māori achieving success as Māori – setting up a framework

Māori achieving success as Māori – setting up a framework

Motu School principal, Paul Cornwall explains the process they went through to setup a framework for Māori achieving success as Māori (MASAM).

Māori succeeding as Māori

Māori succeeding as Māori

Chris Luke, teacher at Coastal Taranaki School, talks about the Te Ika Unahi Nui initiative, using digital technologies, and the benefits this has had for Māori students.

Using the eLPF to inform strategic planning at Waerenga o Kuri

Using the eLPF to inform strategic planning at Waerenga o Kuri

Principal, Richard McCosh explains how they used the e-Learning Planning Framework to identify strengths and areas needing development within their school.

Teaching and learning with Māori tradition and modern technology

Teaching and learning with Māori tradition and modern technology

Te Ika Unahi Nui is a wānanga (learning) partnership between Tarawainuku marae, Coastal Taranaki School, and the local community.

Strengthening Māori identity, language, and culture

Strengthening Māori identity, language, and culture

Students and parents from Coastal Taranaki School talk about the difference marae-based learning has made to their engagement, motivation, and confidence.

Marae-based learning Puniho Pā

Marae-based learning Puniho Pā

Coastal Taranaki School teacher, Chris Luke explains how he connects students' learning at the marae with the learning in the classroom.

Developing a framework to support Māori achieving success as Māori

Developing a framework to support Māori achieving success as Māori

The board of trustees, parent community, and school leadership team at Waerenga O Kuri School explain the collaborative process they used for developing their Māori achieving success as Māori (MASAM) framework.

A teaching approach to enable Māori achieving success as Māori

A teaching approach to enable Māori achieving success as Māori

Yvonne Nikora, Deputy principal at Waerenga o Kuri School, talks about impact the Māori achieving success as Māori (MASAM) framework has had on her teaching.

Māori achieving success as Māori – changing teaching approach

Māori achieving success as Māori – changing teaching approach

Motu School teachers describe how an inclusive approach and incorporating te reo Māori across the school curriculum has impacted on student learning.

Using the eLPF to develop literacy learning goals supported by technologies

Using the eLPF to develop literacy learning goals

Brian Price, Principal of Breens Intermediate, shares how they used the e-Learning Planning Framework to develop their strategic planning.

Te Kura o Kutarere

Connecting with the community

Principal, Dave McShane, teacher Susan Lee, and kaumatua from Te Kura o Kutarere  discuss how technologies have helped to engage the local community to support and share students learning.

Benefits of using technologies in the classroom

Benefits of using technologies in the classroom

Teachers and students at Finlayson Park school describe the flexibility technologies provide for learning and some of the websites they use for teaching te reo and tikanga Māori.

Improving oral language and writing with Photostory

Improving oral language and writing with Photostory

Irongate School teacher, Marion Croad, describes the improvements in her New Entrant students' written and oral language as a result of using Photostory.

Benefits of the MASAM framework for the school community

MASAM framework

Motu School community share their perspectives on the partnership that has been built based on the Māori achieving success as Māori (MASAM) framework they developed together.

Parents engaging in student learning

Parents engaging in student learning

Motu School community talk about the positives of parents engaging in their children's learning.

Developing culturally responsive practice – The benefits of whole staff PLD, online

Developing culturally responsive practice – The benefits of whole staff PLD, online

Pegasus Bay School Principal, Roger Hornblow, talks about the ways that whole-staff PLD benefited them when taking the Te Reo Puāwai course.

Using digital technologies to support the teaching of te reo Māori

Using digital technologies to support the teaching of te reo Māori

Teachers from Pegasus Bay School describe how they use digital technology to support the teaching of te reo Māori.

Creating iBooks

Creating iBooks

Teacher, Mihi Morunga and students describe the process of creating iBooks and the benefits these have in the learning process.

Benefits of using laptops in the writing process

Benefits of using laptops in the writing process

Dave McShane, principal at Te Kura o Kutarere, describes how providing students with laptops to use in the writing process has enabled them to engage and sustain their focus on the task.

Teaching digital stories using tuakana-tana

Teaching digital stories using tuakana-teina

Irongate School has a focus on improving student literacy levels particularly for their large population of Māori and Pasifika students.

Improving student writing with digital stories

Improving student writing with digital stories

Bridget Harrison at Kimi Ora Community School shares how her students are using digital stories to scaffold the writing process.

Building the mana of te reo and tikanga in the classroom

Building the mana of te reo and tikanga in the classroom

Teachers from Pegasus Bay School discuss how introducing waiata, students learning their pepeha and rakau games has created an inclusive environment where tikanga Māori is celebrated and valued.

Te reo Māori in the classroom

Te reo Māori in the classroom

Teachers from Pegasus Bay School share how they incorporate te reo Māori into the classroom.

Building culturally responsive practice schoolwide

Building culturally responsive practice schoolwide

Pegasus Bay School principal, Roger Hornblow explains how Huakina Mai and Te Reo Puāwai helped them build culturally responsive practice schoolwide. 

Sorry, no items found.

Snapshots of learning are examples of effective classroom practice describing the use of digital technologies to support learning and teaching, with links to supporting resources.

Movie Maker

Students from Melville Intermediate prepared and learnt their individual mihi in te reo Māori, then created videos to share their learning using Movie Maker.

Tags: English, Learning languages, Multimedia – video, Primary, Upper primary

Photo Booth

Students at Firth Primary School in Matamata developed fluency and confidence in te reo Māori using Photo Booth.

Tags: Learning languages, Multimedia – video, Middle primary, Primary, Upper primary

Collaborating using Blogger

Students from Melville Intermediate School used Blogger to share their development of te reo Māori and receive feedback.

Tags: English, Learning languages, Blogging, Social media, Primary, Upper primary

Skype

Students from Melville Intermediate helped students from neighbouring Broadlands Primary School prepare and learn a short mihi using Skype.

Tags: English, Learning languages, Collaborative tools, Communication, Primary, Upper primary

Raising student achievement

Polyfest provided Mangere College with the opportunity to re-think curriculum planning and design to improve student achievement results for NCEA.

Tags: English, Learning languages, Science, Social sciences, The Arts, Visual arts, Multimedia – graphics/animation, Multimedia – video, Secondary, Upper secondary

Sorry, no items found.

Tauranga Moana Tamaiti hui – A deliberate strategy to align vision to practice
The Tauranga Moana ICT PD cluster goal is to provide innovative learning models that enhance what it means to be Māori, and raise achievement of all students. Their reflective summary describes the learning conference for 9-12 year olds they planned and held. The conference was designed to bring together the principles and approaches outlined in Ka Hikitia Accelerating Success 2013 – 2017  with effective e-learning pedagogy. Students and teachers from different schools participated in engaging, problem solving workshops using e-learning and ICT tools. The summary contains links to the research and pedagogies that underpin the hui workshops, and to the workshops themselves.

Classroom teaching resources

Key resource

Digistore – Te pātaka matihiko

A storehouse of digital content to support learning across the curriculum. Use the search function to find images, songs, learning objects, audio, video, collections, teacher resources, and assessment resources.

Waitangi Day – how will you commemorate?
Online resources compiled by NZC Online.

Waitangi Day resource round up!
A blog post with a list of useful books and downloadable resources to support primary school teachers introduce Waitangi Day.

Waitangi Day
Free downloadable resources from ABC Teaching.

Te wiki o te reo Māori
Order or download free classroom resources and posters from the Māori Language Commission for use in the classroom.

Māori language week
Te wiki o te reo Māori information and links to resources from NZC Online.

Maori Language Week – Te Wiki o Te Reo Maori quiz
A 10 question quiz to test your knowledge and find a place to start development.

Te Kupu o te Wiki
Register for Kupu o te Rā and you will also receive Te Kupu o te Wiki every Monday.

Story: Te reo Māori – the Māori language alphabet
An interactive from the Te Ara website to support pronunciation of the Māori alphabet.

Story: Te reo Māori – the Māori language consonants
An interactive from the Te Ara website to support pronunciation of consonants in te reo Māori. 

Māori language week – NZ History
History of Māori language, Māori words every New Zealander should know, Māori place names, and more information to support learning.

Te Wiki o Te Reo Māori – Māori Language Week
Online resources and supporting student learning from Christchurch city libraries.

Seven stars of Matariki

Watch Seven Stars of Matariki author Toni Rolleston-Cummins read her book on this YouTube clip. This video was made by Wellington City Libraries in association with Huia Publishers.

Matariki – the Māori New Year

Information and links to nationwide Matariki events.

wickED interactive Matariki

Locate Matariki in this wickED interactive in English and te reo Māori .

A beginner's guide to finding Matariki

A blog post on the Te Ara website providing pictures and instructions for locating Matariki at night.

Matariki star weaving

A YouTube clip demonstrating how to create stars from ribbon. A simple activity, which can be done in the classroom.

Matariki teacher resource

A downloadable resource from TePapa, which includes:

    • information about the relevance of Matariki to Māori
    • practical activities relating to the themes of kaitiakitanga (guardianship), musical instruments, and Māori cloaks
    • Māori vocabulary lists to extend your students’ reo Māorireo Māori Māori languageMāori language.

Matariki for schools

Four pages of cross-curricular classroom activities from the NZ History website.

Matariki

A list of resources for teachers to use with students collated by the National Library NZ.

Matariki – the Māori New Year

A list of activities and resources compiled by NZC Online.

Christchurch city libraries

Matariki teachers' resource

A comprehensive list of resources compiled by Christchurch City Libraries. It contains resources to support Arts, English, Social Sciences, and Science.

12 Huia Birds
George Henare brings the tale of the huia to life in English and Te Reo Māori through a partly animated, partly illustrated story. Comes with printable supporting materials . This is available as a free download from the iTunes store. 

iMarae
A guide for students and teachers showing what to do on a marae visit from Te Wānanga o Aotearoa. This app is available as a free download from the iTunes store.

wickED – Māori themed interactives in English
Interactive activities for students to assist in learning te reo and tikanga Māori.

wickED – Māori interactives
Interactive activities for students to assist in learning te reo and tikanga Māori. Interactives are in te reo Māori.

Te Whata Raki 
Students learn about some traditional stories, told through waiata, pictures, and other web resources. A Christchurch city Libraries resource. 

Kōrero Māori give it a go  
An interactive guide to speaking basic Māori. Learn how to pronounce Māori words and basic conversational phrases. Choose a topic, study the word list, and test yourself with the three simple quizzes.

Te Pūmanawa (The Breath of Life)
A Māori language and culture interactive mobile app, which is accessible on all mobile devices including: Smartphones (Android or Apple) iPads, tablets, notebooks, and desktop computers.

Kura  (iTunes) – Kura  (Android)
A mobile phone application developed by Victoria University’s Faculty of Education. The Kura app includes a range of games modules that allow users to improve their knowledge and understanding of the Maori language.

Māui and his first journey app
A bilingual app for iPhone and iPad is available as a free download from the iTunes store. Māui and his first journey interweaves positive parenting, child development, and brain development information into the traditional pakiwaitara about Māui growing up. Voiced by prominent kaumātua Amster Reedy of Ngāti Porou, the app has been developed by award-winning developer Flightless and illustrated by Ali Teo. Māui and his first journey is available online .

Milly, Molly Māori library
The Milly Molly series of books is now in te reo Māori. These books relate the adventures of two little girls from different ethnic backgrounds with their multi-cultural friends. The books have been written to promote the acceptance of diversity, sound values, and the learning of life skills, ”We may look different but we feel the same.” This iPad app, will download as an empty bookshelf. Users can browse and download free books from the library. The app has a range of built-in supports, such as options to highlight the text, touch a word to hear it read aloud, and the ability to record your own narration.

Ruaumoko: The rumbling voice
An interactive digital book narrated by deaf Māori students in Te Reo Turi and New Zealand Sign Language. This narration is supported by text and audio in Te Reo Māori and English.

The digital book is available from:

Te ako i te reo Māori
Practical activities and resources to support learning te reo Māori, pronunciation, and tikanga Māori, from the Māori Language Commission.

Te reo Māori in English-medium schools
Information and resources relevant to the teaching and learning of te reo Māori in English-medium schools, in this TKI community.

He Reo Tupu, He Reo Ora
Resources for teaching Māori language effectively in the classroom, including: unit plans, resources, videos, and reomations. A TKI website.

Te Whanake
A set of textbooks, study guides, CDs, teachers' manuals, and a dictionary for learning and teaching Māori language. This website also provides access to a further range of associated free online resources for independent learning and interaction.

Kōrero Māori
Māori language learning for beginners and fluent speakers.

Ka mau te wehi
Ka mau te wehi is based on levels 1 and 2 of the draft Te Reo Māori in The New Zealand Curriculum. The resource contains 20 units of work, each having a distinct theme providing opportunities to learn and practise new language. The units are made up of a number of activities based on video clips, which support and guide the teacher when working with students. 

Māori dictionary online
Look up words, phrases, and proverbs in Māori.

Story: Te reo Māori – the Māori language alphabet
An interactive from the Te Ara website to support pronunciation of the Māori alphabet.

Story: Te reo Māori – the Māori language consonants

An interactive from the Te Ara website to support pronunciation of consonants in te reo Māori. 

Tikanga Māori
Tikanga (guidelines and protocols) for greetings, pōwhiri, karanaga, mihimihi, marae visits, whakataukī, waiata.

Wharenui
A bilingual interactive to learn about the different parts of the wharenui. An interactive from the wickED website on TKI.

Te Kāhui Māngai
Te Kāhui Māngai is primarily designed to provide information on iwi (tribes) in New Zealand, including their rohe, hapū, marae, and representative organisations. It also includes certain national and Māori organisations.

How Maui slowed the sun
An animated YouTube clip, read in Māori with English subtitles.

The fish of Maui
The legend of how Maui caught the great fish that is the North Island of New Zealand. This YouTube clip is visual only. It has no text.

Te ika a Maui
A PhotoStory of The Fish of Maui– Te Ika a Maui retold by Solway Primary School children in Masterton New Zealand on YouTube.

Hei Waiata, Hei Whakakoakoa
Waiata with a songbook with lyrics, song sheets, curriculum achievement objectives, and suggestions for activities

Resources to support teaching practice

These resources provide supporting materials for teachers to develop the cultural competencies such as Manaakitanga (enabling akonga/learner outcomes such as knowing about local tikanga and respecting the culture of akonga), and engage learners.

Key resources

Tātaiako – Cultural competencies for teachers of Māori learners
This document from the New Zealand Teachers Council is designed for teachers in early childhood education (ECE) services and in primary and secondary schools. It will support your work to personalise learning for and with Māori learners, to ensure they enjoy education success as Māori.

Supporting Māori students
This guide focuses on inclusive teaching and learning strategies that can be used in the classroom to create a more effective learning environment for all Māori students.

Kahikitia – Accelerating success 2013-2017
The Ministry of Education's strategy to rapidly change how the education system performs so that all Māori students gain the skills, qualifications and knowledge they need to enjoy and achieve education success as Māori.

Teachers as learners: Improving outcomes for Māori and Pasifika students through inquiry
These learning materials illustrate how teachers have used an inquiry approach to teaching to become more culturally responsive and to improve outcomes for their Māori and Pasifika students.

Me Kōrero, Let’s Talk!
The Me Kōrero – Let’s Talk! project gathered together the ideas and experiences of Māori students and those closest to them. These ideas and experiences guide how we ensure the education system suits Māori students and develops confident, successful, culturally intelligent, bilingual young people who will contribute positively to New Zealand. Downloadable PDF documents are at the bottom of the page.

Te Mangōroa
A resource for English-medium schools. It is a portal to stories, reports, statistics, and reviews from across TKI and other sites that reflect effective practices to support Māori learners to achieve education success as Māori. Te Mangōroa contains practical illustrations of what Ka Hikitia  means for teaching and learning.

Hā o te Rā  
Interactive language sessions with others online, a course delivered via Webinar (for group sessions) and Skype for one-on-one sessions.

Creating a digital mihi
PowerPoint slides and teacher notes on how and why to create a digital mihi.

Education for Māori: Relationships between schools and whānau
This report brings together information about relationships between families and schools. It gives examples of practices that build effective relationships and highlights the importantance for Māori to know who the people behind the school gate are, as well as what those people do. Whānau, primary, and secondary schools were surveyed to find out what they thought about their relationships.
Author: Report for the controller and auditor-general Tumuaki o te Mana Aratoke
Published: 2015

Partners in learning: Schools’ engagement with parents, families, and communities in New Zealand
The Education Review Office (ERO) conducted an external evaluation in over two hundred New Zealand schools to find out more about the engagement between schools and the parents and whānau of their students. It expands on the six key factors critical to enhancing and strengthening this engagement: leadership, relationships, school culture, partnerships, community networks, and communication.
Author: Mutch, C. and Collins, S. 
Published: 2012

Critical success factors for effective use of e-learning with Māori learners
The experiences of participants at a hui in December 2004 are described.
Author: Institutes of technology and polytechnics of New Zealand
Published: 2004

Critical success factors and effective pedagogy for e-learning in tertiary education
This paper provides information about effective teaching and learning practices for e-learning in tertiary education to enhance learning outcomes for Māori e-learners.
Author: NZCER
Published: 2004


Footer: