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Māori achieving success as Māori – MASAM

What is Māori achieving success as Māori?

"As Māori [means] being able to have access to te ao Māori, the Māori world – access to language, culture, marae… tikanga... and resources... If after twelve or so years of formal education, a Māori youth were totally unprepared to interact within te ao Māori, then, no matter what else had been learned, education would have been incomplete."

Professor Mason Durie, (2003). Ngā Kahui Pou: Launching Māori Futures. Huia Publications. 

Accessed from: Effective governance Supporting education success as Māori: Information for school boards of trustees 2013

Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success 2013–2017  is the Government's strategy to rapidly change how education performs so that all Māori students gain the skills, qualifications, and knowledge they need to enjoy and achieve education success as Māori.

When the vision is realised, all Māori students will:

  • have their identity, language and culture valued and included in teaching and learning in ways that support them to engage and achieve success
  • know their potential and feel supported to set goals and take action to achieve success
  • experience teaching and learning that is relevant, engaging, rewarding and positive
  • have gained the skills, knowledge and qualifications they need to achieve success in te ao Māori, New Zealand and the wider world.

The MASAM framework

Māori achieving success as Māori – a framework

In this EDtalk Kathe Tawhiwhirangi, professional learning facilitator for CORE Education, discusses the MASAM framework she has used with schools to help them consider how to build an environment for Māori students to achieve success as Māori.

Facilitators Kathe Tawhiwhirangi and Trevor Bond created a template, Māori Achieving Success As Māori (MASAM)/Culturally Responsive school-derived self review template  using Tātaiako: Cultural competencies for teachers of Māori learners . The matrix is a progression from "Deficit behaviours" to "Highly responsive behaviours" in relation to the five cultural competencies of Tātaiako (ako, whanaungatanga, tangata whenuatanga, manaakitanga, and wānanga). 

Waerenga O Kuri School community share their perspectives on the partnership that has been built based on the Māori achieving success as Māori (MASAM) framework they developed together.

More information »

What changes does your school need to make for Māori to succeed as Māori?

Critical factors for success of the Māori education strategy, Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success 2013–2017  include:

  • quality provision – leadership, teaching and learning, supported by effective governance
  • strong engagement and contribution from parents, families and whānau, iwi, and community.

Making change to enable Māori to succeed as Māori involves:

  • developing new, and expanding current teaching and learning approaches that are engaging, effective, and enjoyable for all Māori students.
  • having high expectations for all Māori students
  • growing knowledge and evidence of what works to support excellent educational and Māori language outcomes
  • developing productive partnerships with parents, families and whānau, iwi, and community that are responsive and reciprocal – leading to shared action, outcomes, and solutions.

Motu School principal, Paul Cornwall explains the process they went through to setup a framework for Māori achieving success as Māori (MASAM).

Use these questions in conjunction with the Māori Achieving Success As Māori (MASAM)/Culturally Responsive school-derived self-review template  to create your school's self-review framework.

Achievement
  • What evidence of Māori student achievement do we gather at our school?
  • How is this analysed and shared to inform our planning and classroom practice?
Expectations
  • What are our expectations for Māori achievement?
  • Are our expectations built on a Māori potential approach?
Productive partnerships
  • How do we include Māori students and their parents, whānau, hapū, iwi, and Māori communities in decision making around Māori achievement and expectations?
Next steps
  • What are our school's short-term, mid-term, and long-term plans to strengthen Māori student achievement?
  • How can digital technologies and ako-e (e-learning) be used to support your planning and implementation?

For more stories on how the MASAM framework has been used in Motu and Waerenga o Kuri Schools, see the school stories tab .

Discussion groups in the Virtual Learning Network

These discussions can be viewed by the public but to post on the threads or begin your own discussion you need to join these groups in the Virtual Learning Network (VLN). 

The board of trustees, parent community, and school leadership team at Waerenga O Kuri School explain the collaborative process they used for developing their Māori achieving success as Māori (MASAM) framework. The result has been a real community partnership to improve student learning outcomes in a culturally responsive and inclusive manner.

Parents, BOT, and teachers from Motu School discuss their collaboration to create their Māori achieving success as Māori (MASAM framework). An area of significant progress is whanaungatanga. They have deliberate strategies in place to make connections with whānau and community, both formally and informally.

Explore the content of the curriculum

Review your school curriculum asking:

  • Where are the voices of whānau in this curriculum? 
  • How far does the curriculum fit the students and the graduate profile? (or do they have to fit into it?).

Ako – Integrating technologies into pedagogy

The use of technologies can help teachers and ākonga:

  • access and capture the expertise that Māori parents, whānau, hapū, and iwi offer, for example this video demonstrates innovating with ICT
  • integrate knowledge of local context, tikanga, history, and language – including the prior knowledge that ākonga bring with them
  • use local Māori contexts (such as whakapapa, environment, tikanga, language, history, place, economy, politics, local icons, geography) to support Māori learners’ learning.

Yvonne Nikora, Deputy principal at Waerenga o Kuri School, talks about impact the Māori achieving success as Māori (MASAM) framework has had on her teaching. She describes using technologies to enable students as they create a story of their turangawaewae. For students, the result of this authentic learning context has been developing a sense of belonging and ownership.

Online resources supporting te reo and tikanga Māori

Online resources supporting te reo and tikanga Māori

Te Kura o Tiori Burnham School principal, Rob Clarke talks about setting up Taha Māori @ Te Kura o Tiori as part of their school website. 

Using Storybird to improve literacy skills

Using Storybird to improve literacy skills

Susan Lee, teacher at Te Kura o Kutarere shares how using Storybird in her classroom has made a significant impact on the literacy development of her students

Benefits of using laptops in the writing process

Benefits of using laptops in the writing process

Dave McShane, principal at Te Kura o Kutarere, describes how providing students with laptops to use in the writing process has enabled them to engage and sustain their focus on the task.

Students take ownership of their learning

Students take ownership of their learning

Staff at Te Kura o Kutarere talk about the change in students' attitude to learning that has occurred as a result of using Storybird in the writing process. 

Te Kura o Kutarere

Connecting with the community

Principal, Dave McShane, teacher Susan Lee, and kaumatua from Te Kura o Kutarere  discuss how technologies have helped to engage the local community to support and share students learning.

Inquiry in the classroom

Inquiry in the classroom

Teachers and students describe how using ICTs adds value to the inquiry process in the classroom.

Creating iBooks

Creating iBooks

Teacher, Mihi Morunga and students describe the process of creating iBooks and the benefits these have in the learning process.

Benefits of using technologies in the classroom

Benefits of using technologies in the classroom

Teachers and students at Finlayson Park school describe the flexibility technologies provide for learning and some of the websites they use for teaching te reo and tikanga Māori.

Teaching digital stories using tuakana-tana

Teaching digital stories using tuakana-teina

Irongate School has a focus on improving student literacy levels particularly for their large population of Māori and Pasifika students.

Improving oral language and writing with Photostory

Improving oral language and writing with Photostory

Irongate School teacher, Marion Croad, describes the improvements in her New Entrant students' written and oral language as a result of using Photostory.

Improving student writing with digital stories

Improving student writing with digital stories

Bridget Harrison at Kimi Ora Community School shares how her students are using digital stories to scaffold the writing process.

Using the eLPF to inform strategic planning at Waerenga o Kuri

Using the eLPF to inform strategic planning at Waerenga o Kuri

Principal, Richard McCosh explains how they used the e-Learning Planning Framework to identify strengths and areas needing development within their school.

Developing a framework to support Māori achieving success as Māori

Developing a framework to support Māori achieving success as Māori

The board of trustees, parent community, and school leadership team at Waerenga O Kuri School explain the collaborative process they used for developing their Māori achieving success as Māori (MASAM) framework.

A teaching approach to enable Māori achieving success as Māori

A teaching approach to enable Māori achieving success as Māori

Yvonne Nikora, Deputy principal at Waerenga o Kuri School, talks about impact the Māori achieving success as Māori (MASAM) framework has had on her teaching.

A student’s perspective of inclusive education

Inclusion

Waerenga o Kuri student, Herepo Wynyard talks about how the involvement of her whānau both online (through her e-portfolio), and face-to-face at school has encouraged success with her learning goals.

Benefits of the MASAM framework for the school community

MASAM framework

Motu School community share their perspectives on the partnership that has been built based on the Māori achieving success as Māori (MASAM) framework they developed together.

Māori achieving success as Māori – setting up a framework

Māori achieving success as Māori – setting up a framework

Motu School principal, Paul Cornwall explains the process they went through to setup a framework for Māori achieving success as Māori (MASAM).

Māori achieving success as Māori – changing teaching approach

Māori achieving success as Māori – changing teaching approach

Motu School teachers describe how an inclusive approach and incorporating te reo Māori across the school curriculum has impacted on student learning.

MASAM supported by technology

MASAM supported by technology

Students and teachers at Motu School describe how the VLN Learning Exchange and digital technologies support Māori achieving success as Māori.

Parents engaging in student learning

Parents engaging in student learning

Motu School community talk about the positives of parents engaging in their children's learning.

Creating MASAM – Collaborating with the community

Creating MASAM – Collaborating with the community

Parents, BOT, and teachers from Motu School discuss their collaboration around whanaungatanga to create their Māori achieving success as Māori (MASAM framework).

Māori succeeding as Māori

Māori succeeding as Māori

Chris Luke, teacher at Coastal Taranaki School, talks about the Te Ika Unahi Nui initiative, using digital technologies, and the benefits this has had for Māori students.

Strengthening Māori identity, language, and culture

Strengthening Māori identity, language, and culture

Students and parents from Coastal Taranaki School talk about the difference marae-based learning has made to their engagement, motivation, and confidence.

Marae-based learning Puniho Pā

Marae-based learning Puniho Pā

Coastal Taranaki School teacher, Chris Luke explains how he connects students' learning at the marae with the learning in the classroom.

Teaching and learning with Māori tradition and modern technology

Teaching and learning with Māori tradition and modern technology

Te Ika Unahi Nui is a wānanga (learning) partnership between Tarawainuku marae, Coastal Taranaki School, and the local community.

Planning for success for Māori across the Katote cluster

Planning for success for Māori across the Katote cluster

Supporting Māori learners success is one of Katote clusters goals. Woodend School principal, Graeme Barber discusses the process of inviting feedback from whānau. 

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Resources and research

Kahikitia – Accelerating success 2013-2017

Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success 2013–2017

The Government’s strategy to rapidly change how education performs so that all Māori students gain the skills, qualifications, and knowledge they need to succeed and to be proud in knowing who they are as Māori.

One more look at Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success 2013–2017

These blog posts on NZC Online look closely at different aspects of the Māori education strategy and provide questions, resources, and suggested actions for school leaders and kaiako.

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Tātaiako: Cultural competencies for teachers of Māori learners

A guide to the development of cultural competencies teachers to create a learning environment where Māori learners achieve successfully Māori.

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Te Mangōroa

Te Mangōroa is a resource for English-medium schools. It is a portal to stories, reports, statistics, and reviews from across TKI and other sites that reflect effective practices to support Māori learners to achieve education success as Māori. Te Mangōroa contains practical illustrations for the Māori education strategy, Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success, means for teaching and learning.

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Tau Mai Te Reo – The Māori language in education strategy 2013 – 2017

The strategy expresses what the Ministry of Education and education sector agencies will do for learners of Māori language in Education. 

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Te Kotahitanga: Raising Māori student achievement

Te Kotahitanga is a research and professional development programme that supports teachers to improve Māori students' learning and achievement.

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He Kākano

He Kākano is a strategic school-based professional development programme with an explicit focus on improving culturally responsive leadership and teacher practices to ensure Māori learners enjoy educational success as Māori.

Te Reo Māori in English-medium schools

Information and resources relevant to the teaching and learning of te reo Māori in English-medium schools.

Telling stories: Recording the school experiences of Māori learners

In this Education Gazette article, Principal Peggy Burrows discusses her PhD research that asks what it means to be a bicultural leader in a South Island context.

Neal, Terry, & Collier, Hohaia. (2006). Weaving kaupapa Māori and e-Learning. He Puna Korero: Journal of Maori and Pacific Development, 7(2), 68–73.

NZCER. (2004). Critical Success Factors and Effective Pedagogy for e-learning in Tertiary Education: Background paper for ITP New Zealand. Retrieved from http://www.minedu.govt.nz/~/media/MinEdu/Files/EducationSectors/TertiaryEducation/NZCERFinalReport.pdf

Tiakiwai, S.J., & Tiakiwai, H. (2010). A Literature Review focused on Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs) and e-Learning in the Context of Te Reo Māori and Kaupapa Māori Education. Ministry of Education (NZ). Retrieved from http://thehub.superu.govt.nz/sites/default/files/42612_LitRev-VLEs-FINALv2_0.pdf

e-Learning community discussions

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