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Flipped learning

Learning from home

Advice and resources for parents and whānau, teachers, and leaders spanning early learning through to senior secondary to support learning at home.

What is flipped learning?

In a flipped learning setting, teachers make lessons available to students to be accessed whenever and wherever it is convenient for the student, at home, in class, on the bus, or even from a hospital bed. Teachers can deliver this instruction by recording and narrating screencasts of work they do on their computers, creating videos of themselves teaching, or curating video lessons from trusted Internet sites. 

The flipped learning model: A white paper

Traditional classroom

Flipped classroom

The teacher delivers new learning to the students face-to-face.

Students listen, interact, take notes, and then consolidate new knowledge during homework or followup tasks.

Students do the basic learning prior to working with the teacher and then cover the applied learning and any problems in class. 

Students access a teacher-created website and/or watch teacher-created/sourced videos on their devices.

They are able to stop and rewind the information as often as they need until they understand the concept.

There is less passive learning in class and more active and personalised learning.

Class time is freed up for:

  • student-centred learning activities
  • inquiry-based learning
  • project-based learning
  • collaborative work
  • teacher-assisted learning.

Technology, the new pedagogy, and flipped teaching

Michael Fullan describes the flipped classroom. Teachers become activators or change agents, students become partners in learning, and technology fuels communication and collaboration.

 

More information » 

  • The flipped classroom (2014)
    Article by Jonathan Bergmann and Aaron Sams, the teacher-pioneers of flipped learning explaining the why and how of flipping the classroom. 

Benefits of flipped learning

"Flipped learning creates a student centred environment."

Education Review

Students personalise their learning

Students can access instruction anytime, anywhere on their devices. They can return to the instructional material, pause, rewind, and playback as often as needed to develop understanding. This gives students control over their learning.   

The teacher is available to help students with higher level learning

Teachers have more time during class to focus on higher-order thinking, personalise learning, and assist students understanding.

Absent students don't miss out on key content

Because you have made key content available online, helping absent students catch up on missed lessons can be as simple as giving them the links to your online materials. 

Whānau can engage with their child's learning

Providing whānau with access to your flipped classroom and encouraging them to watch your instructional videos and discuss the content with their child fosters engagement with their child's learning, as well as helping to clarify learning.

Inclusive

Some barriers to learning are removed. Students are provided with multiple means of representation on a website, they are able to control the pace they learn, and where and when they learn. 

Promotes independent learning

Students can work at their own pace and personalise their learning. Students who need to spend more time on a particular topic can use the resources made available to them to master content and revisit content as often as needed. Flipping the classroom can help students take ownership over their learning.  

Promotes digital fluency

Many flipped learning tasks are supported by LMSs, chat forums, and other online tools. Putting learning materials online and encouraging students to collaborate using digital technologies and select tools to present and share their learning supports the development of digital fluency.

Teacher, Sara Lambert explains the explicit teaching that she did with her class to help them work successfully using a flipped approach. Her students share the benefits for their learning. They find having short focused instruction with followup practice activities helpful. They feel like they have much more access to the teacher as they can rewind and rewatch videos and they don't have to remember a long series of instructions.

Benefits of flipped learning – further reading

Challenges of flipped learning

It can create or exacerbate a digital divide

Flipped learning can exclude students who don't have ready access to internet-enabled devices. This is particularly hard on students from families who already have limited access to resources (Acedo, 20132 ). School and community support need to address this issue in a way that works for their students.

Students not engaging with content prior to class

Blended learning can be a way to address this. Demonstration of content knowledge can be measured through quizzes and production tasks built around the video. Also, a growing number of LMSs offer analytics that show, for example, whether a student has accessed your online material.

Increased teacher workload

Creating and managing a website and/or video resources for your students takes preparation, planning, time and skill. This can increase teacher workload.

However, once the videos have been made, they can be re-used reducing time spent on planning for the delivery of content knowledge, revising key content with students, and catching up absentees.  

Challenges of flipped learning – further reading

How to flip your classroom

Before you start:

  • consider – how will flipping benefit your students?
  • check your students have access to the internet at home. If not, can they have access to the school's wifi after hours through the library or a computer lab?
Computer screen showing Mrs Dunn Maths website

 

Start with a concept some or all of your students find challenging.

1. Identify the learning objectives and instructional strategies.

Decide on how you will present the new material for students to interact with and gain familiarity prior to the class. Ask yourself: 

  • what is the best way to communicate and present the new instructional material e.g., video, podcast, narrated PowerPoint, text, animation, simulation, online multimedia module? 
  • will my students be able to process this content in this format effectively?

Think about your students:

  • Do you have students with English as a second language? Is the language in your material clear and easy for them to understand? 
  • Do the videos have closed captions for students? This will help students with hearing difficulties and ESL learners.
  • Make your instructional material short and clear; a video should not be longer than 10 minutes.

2. Design activities that motivate your students to engage with the content and prepare before class

Ask students to: 

  • respond to open-ended questions online about the instructional material before class 
  • prepare questions 
  • attempt to solve some problems.

3. Plan in-class activities that provide students with opportunities to deepen their understanding

This maybe individual or collaborative practice.

If your students are working from home, put independent follow-up activities for students online with clear instructions. Remember follow-up activities can be hands-on, practical tasks involving writing, drawing, construction. These can then be shared through uploading a photo or linking to a document.

4. Determine what students should do after the in-class activity 

This may include an ongoing student inquiry, collaborative work, or further instruction for those needing specific support. 

5. Plan for ongoing formative and summative ways to assess student understanding 

Based on previous teaching, did your students' learning improve as a result of the new flipped approach?

Flipped learning from home

While flipped learning was originally intended to be used in a classroom setting, it can be adapted for use when learning is unable to be delivered face-to-face. It is still possible to facilitate discussions, answer questions, and run interactive demonstrations.

You can:

  • deliver the classroom component via real-time communications technology such as Zoom, Google Meet, or Microsoft Teams. More information about these tools is on the Communication technologies  page.
  • plan and provide the flipped aspect through your teacher-created website or learning management system. 
Student with iPad and headphones looking at classroom website

Considerations for working with students learning remotely

Keep communications clear

Student/teacher interaction is an important part of the flipped learning process. Be open and clear to students and parents about what times you will be online and what channels they should use to contact you. 

As your ākonga interact with the media you have created for them, they need an online space to discuss ideas, understanding, and ask questions. Indicate how they can do this, for example: 

  • you are online at certain times to answer questions face-to-face
  • create online discussion topics, this maybe in your class Facebook group, through your LMS, in your Google site
  • students can email questions
  • setup a Google doc where students can ask questions and you and/or their peers provide answers
  • support students to collaborate with each other online.
Manage time

Plan tasks/activities for students which they can do at their own pace, in their own time, as some may be sharing devices between family members at home. Rather than sticking to a rigid daily timetable, allow students to choose what times they will work on learning tasks throughout the day. But be clear about when you, as the teacher, would like it to be completed/attempted by.

Follow up

Check in regularly with all students. Find out if they are having difficulty:

  • understanding the task or information – provide options for them to ask questions and receive support, you could record a short video explaining further detail 
  • accessing a device – support them to timetable device sharing, or can your school provide a device?
  • with connectivity – support them to troubleshoot with their parents/whānau, for example does the time of day make a difference, is connectivity better at times when other family members aren’t online or watching Netflix, is connectivity better in certain rooms nearer the wifi. 
More information »

Teachers, Sara and Emma explain how they plan their lessons for a flipped classroom including how they make their instructional videos.

Tips for recording video lessons

  • Write a script. Include the transcript and sub-title your video. 
  • Keep it short and focused.
  • Use a teleprompter app while speaking to the camera to maintain eye contact.
  • Put your face in the video.
  • Smile for three seconds at the start and end.
  • Introduce the learning goal in the first 10 seconds.
  • Speak slowly and clearly.
  • Don’t worry about being perfect.
Tips for creating flipped videos

Source: Danielle Myburgh @missdtheteacher www.missdtheteacher.blogspot.com

More information »

English teacher, Kerry Boyde-Preece describes how she uses Screencastify  to create tutorials for her students to prepare for and review their learning. The videos sit on their class Google site, Year 9 English with Mrs Boyde-Preece  and are accessible for students anywhere anytime.

Tamaki College maths teacher, Noelene Dunn has set up a Google site for her students to support a flexible and inclusive approach to learning. She and her students explain how they use it. Students value having a lot of different activities to choose from. Students can personalise their learning and select activities to support their learning focus.

“The activities are designed so that they (the students) can work autonomously if they want to. They don’t need me to lecture them – sometimes we’ll have small little snippets of me talking to them and the rest of the time I’m moving around the room, checking up, seeing how they are going, giving them help, talking in small groups or in one to one, and I find that so much more effective”.

Caleb Allison, teacher – social studies and geography, Tamaki College

Carl Condiliffe explains flipped learning and how he uses it in his PE class. This is a 40 minute presentation from Future Learning Environments eTV.

 

The flipped class: Which tools are right for you?

The flipped classroom is a pedagogical solution with a technological component. 

Flipped learning pioneers, Jonathan Bergmann and Aaron Sams give an overview of the digital technologies you can use to flip the classroom.

Learning management systems

Learning management systems (LMS) are interactive spaces where you can build activities, host group chats, and share a range of resources and materials. LMSs are powerful tools for flipped learning because of the interactive tasks you can place around instructional videos to reinforce learning.

More information » 

  • Google Classroom  – An online tool to create classes, distribute assignments, send feedback, and see everything in one place. Student work can be followed up easily with discussion and collaborative analysis. It integrates easily with the rest of G Suite .
  • MS teams  – Microsoft Teams brings conversations, content, assignments, and apps together in one place.
  • Moodle  – A well established open-source LMS.

Create a website

Free and easy-to-use website creators like Google Sites  and Weebly  can be effective tools for hosting content and flipping the classroom.

NZ school examples 

  • DigiTech  – A Google site supporting years 7-13 focusing on digital technologies by Hinerau Anderson, Tamaki College.
  • Room 3 at Matawai School  – A Google Site to support learners.
  • Bloomscool  – A weebly supporting L2 and L3 Science by Graeme Bloomfield, Nayland College.

Using video

When teachers create their own videos, students identify more with their learning.

– Clement, 2014

Screencasting

Screencasting is a video recording of what's happening on your computer screen. Screencasting allows you to speak directly to your students while presenting them with visual recording of your computer's desktop providing a step-by-step approach.

PE teacher, Carl Condliffe from Rongatai College shares a screencast with students

  • My Study series – Is Carl Condliffe's flipped learning website. Teachers have free access during the Covid-19 lockdown in NZ
How to screencast
Screencasting tools
  • Google Screencastify  – Screen recorder which you can add to your Chrome browser as an extension. Videos can be saved and shared from your Google Drive. The basic option is free. It works with other google applications.
  • Educreations  – iPad app for making and sharing screencasts
  • Explain everything  – Collaborative interactive whiteboard app for OS, Android, and PC
  • Microsoft PowerPoint and OneNote – Include built-in screen recording functions

Making videos using a smartphone or tablet

You can use your smartphone or tablet to make videos anytime, anywhere.

Andrew Ricciardi from Waimea College has a YouTube channel  for maths instruction. In this video, he records an explanation of how to factorise an equation.

Tools to create and edit videos

Use the inbuilt editing functionality on your phone or tablet or use an app like:

Tips for making videos
  • If possible, use a tripod or some other way to keep your phone or tablet still.
  • Use a whiteboard or sheet of paper and pens to help you explain what you are teaching.
  • Keep your videos short and focused.

Creating animations

PowToon  and GoAnimate  are easy-to-use animation building tools for creating your own videos. They're also creative presenting tools for students.

Hosting and sharing videos

Videos can be saved and shared like any other file using Google Drive or Microsoft Office 365. Or, you can set up an online channel for your videos. This keeps them in one space and makes them easily accessible for viewing, downloading, or embedding on a website or LMS. Students can download them to their device at school for viewing at home if they do not have internet access. 

Upload video to YouTube
Putting your videos on YouTube and creating a channel carries the advantage of housing your content together in an easily accessible space that are generally used to using.

  • Example: MrRicciardi73  is Waimea College teacher, Andrew Ricciardi's YouTube channel for maths instruction.

Upload video to Vimeo
Vimeo is a video upload and sharing platform that is free to use (with a basic account). It's ad-free, unlike YouTube.

SchoolTube
A free-to-use moderated video sharing platform, specifically designed for students and educators.

Flipgrid logo

Flipgrid
An online tool for you or students to post and respond to videos.

Select pre-existing videos to share with your students

Teachers can draw on the ever-growing pool of instructional video resources online. Link to them or embed them onto your blended learning platform to share with students.

Khan academy
1000s of hours of instructional videos on a range of subjects, including maths, computing, and art history. Exercises are included to consolidate knowledge. 

 

TEDEd
Contains lessons and videos around particular topics.

Crash course
YouTube channel with an extensive range of well designed instructional videos and animations covering a range of topics. 

Resources

  • flippedlearning.org
    Educators hub for flipped learning. Contains resources, how-to's, and information about flipped learning. 
  • Flipping for beginners
    This article from the Harvard Education Review gives detailed models of teachers' methods for flipping the classroom.
  • Communication technologies
    Practical information on technologies and platforms available for NZ schools to support flipped learning and learning from home

Snapshot of learning

Flipped learning at Ashhurst School

Principal, Heath Chittenden introduced the flipped learning model to Ashhurst School in 2016. This schoolwide approach to learning has focused teachers and improved student learning outcomes, particularly in boys writing.

If you would like some some support, email Heath hchittenden@ashhurst.school.nz  to arrange a 1-1 discussion. 

Videos

Student on Chromebook

Rewindable learning

Teachers, students, and parents from Bay of Islands College talk about rewindable learning and the benefits that it has for them.

Teacher, Sara Lambert talking to students in her classroom

Flipped learning: Changes to teacher practice

Teachers, Sara and Emma, talk about the biggest changes they have seen in their teaching since they started using flipped learning. “I think for me the biggest changes that it’s had are it’s more individually centred and it’s changed my position within the classroom.”

Teacher, Emma Jensen working at a desk on an iPad

Planning a flipped session

Teachers, Sara and Emma, explain how they plan their lessons for a flipped classroom including how they make their instructional videos.

Two students sit at a desk with their iPads

Benefits of a flipped approach to student learning in a junior classroom

Teacher, Emma, talks about the independence children gain and how she gets more one-on-one time with students by using the flipped approach. One student shares how she uses the class site to share work with her parents.

Two students sit at a desk with their iPads

Benefits of a flipped classroom for student learning

A teacher and her students talk about the the benefits they have noticed from using flipped learning in their classroom and the flexibility that it allows.

A student using a wall chart to show whether she needs help or is 'Good to go'

Inclusion in the flipped classroom

Teachers Sara Lambert and Emma Jensen explain how the flipped model allows them to tailor the learning to students' individual needs. 

Students managing the zebra crossing outside the school

The flipped learning model – Purpose and pedagogy at Ashhurst School

Ashhurst School Principal, Heath Chittenden, speaks about the flipped learning global standards project and how they have created a standard so that flipped learning looks the same no matter where in the world you are based.

The entrance to a school. A girl stands at the fence of the school reading a book.

Setting up and establishing the flipped approach at Ashhurst School

Ashhurst School Principal, Heath Chittenden, explains how they got teachers and parents prepared before rolling out flipped learning in their school. “Flipped learning is really important to be a school-wide focus because it actually is a pedagogical change to how you approach teaching.”

Teachers work together on laptops

Sustaining the flipped learning pedagogy within your school

Ashhurst School Principal, Heath Chittenden, shares how important it is that all staff are trained to use the flipped learning model and the resource bank that is available to them.

Principal, Heath Chittenden, looking at stats on his computer

Raising student achievement using a flipped model of learning

Staff from Ashhurst School talk about where they have seen achievement levels rise in their school and how they think flipped learning has attributed to that.

Flexible learning using Google sites

Flexible learning using Google sites

Tamaki College maths teacher, Noelene Dunn has set up a Google site for her students to support a flexible and inclusive approach to learning. She and her students explain how they use it. 

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Resources

Key resource

Flipped Learning Global Initiative  (FLGI)

A worldwide coalition of educators, researchers, technologists, professional development providers, and education leaders in 49 countries who are committed to effectively reaching every student every day through flipped learning. The FLGI global community offers resources and tools to support successful Flipped Learning from k12 to higher education. Get a detailed roadmap, watch free tutorials, or earn your Flipped Learning Level-1 certification. All resources are aligned with the Academy of Active Learning Arts and Sciences’ global standards.

Communication technologies

Information to help you select a platform for online, real-time, face-to-face communication with students in your class. Practical tips for teachers working with a virtual class, and lots of useful resources to help you set up and get started.

Examples of flipped classrooms in New Zealand

  • Ashhurst School
    Principal, Heath Chittendon leads by example. All the teachers in Ashhurst School employ flipped learning.
  • MrRicciardi73
    Andrew Ricciardi, Waimea College has a YouTube channel for maths instruction. 
  • DigiTech
    A Google site supporting years 7-13 focusing on digital technologies by Hinerau Anderson, Tamaki College.
  • Bloomscool
    A weebly supporting L2 and L3 Science by Graeme Bloomfield, Nayland College.

How to flip your classroom

Flipped learning hubs

  • flippedlearning.org
    Educators hub for flipped learning. Contains resources, how-to's, and information about flipped learning. 

Instructional video collections

Khan academy
1000s of hours of instructional videos on a range of subjects, including maths, computing, and art history. Exercises are included to consolidate knowledge. 

 

TEDEd
Contains lessons and videos around particular topics.

Crash course
YouTube channel with an extensive range of well designed instructional videos and animations covering a range of topics. 

Readings

What is flipped learning?

  • Flipping for beginners
    This article from the Harvard Education Review gives detailed models of teachers' methods for flipping the classroom
  • Education review
    This 2014 article on Education Review discuses flipped learning in Kiwi classrooms.

Benefits of flipped learning

Challenges of flipped learning

Tools

Video sharing tools

Upload video to YouTube
Instructions for uploading videos to YouTube. YouTube is free.

Upload video to Vimeo
Instructions for uploading videos to Vimeo. Vimeo is a video upload and sharing platform that is free to use (with a basic account). It's ad-free.

SchoolTube
A free-to-use moderated video sharing platform, specifically designed for students and educators.

Blended learning platforms

Moodle

Moodle is a learning management system. It provides browser-based access to all functions, so that students and teachers can access it at anytime.

Google classroom

An online tool to create classes, distribute assignments, send feedback, and see everything in one place. Student work can be followed up easily with discussion and collaborative analysis. Integrates easily with other google applications such as gmail, docs, and forms.

Website building tools

Google sites

Google Sites  

Google Sites allows you to create a website without having to know how to code it yourself. It is free and part of the Google suite of products.

Weebly

Weebly is a website building tool. It has a range of packages, including a free one for basic use. 

Screencasting tools

  • Google Screencastify  – Screen recorder which you can add to your Chrome browser as an extension. Videos can be saved and shared from your Google Drive. The basic option is free. It works with other google applications.
  • Loom  and Screencast-O-Matic  – Multi-platform screen recorders
  • Educreations  – iPad app for making and sharing screencasts
  • Explain everything  – Collaborative interactive whiteboard app for OS, Android, and PC
  • Microsoft PowerPoint and OneNote – Include built-in screen recording functions

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