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Teacher standards and e-learning

The Standards are applicable for every teacher who holds a Practising Certificate, regardless of role or teaching context. The Standards were implemented on 1 January 2018. All teachers, schools, kura, and centres must use the new Standards for appraisal.

Using this resource

The six teacher standards have been "unpacked" using e-learning examples to illustrate each standard.

The Tātaiako competencies have been linked to the relevant standards.

Teachers can:

  • identify how their current practice in e-learning supports the standards and record this in official appraisal documents
  • use the e-learning examples to develop their own practice and inform teacher inquires.

School leaders can support teachers to develop goals related to the standards, which incorporate e-learning.

Standard 1: Te Tiriti o Waitangi partnership

Demonstrate commitment to tangata whenuatanga and Te Tiriti o Waitangi partnership in Aotearoa New Zealand.

Elaboration of the standard
  • Understand and recognise the unique status of tangata whenua in Aotearoa New Zealand.
  • Understand and acknowledge the histories, heritages, languages, and cultures of partners to Te Tiriti o Waitangi.
  • Practice and develop the use of te reo and tikanga Māori.

Tātaiako competency

  • Tangata whenuatanga – I affirm Māori learners as Māori. I provide contexts for learning where the identity, language, and culture of Māori learners and their whānau is affirmed.
  • Whanaungatanga  I actively engage in respectful working relationships with Māori Learners, parents and whānau, hāpu, iwi and the Māori community.

Yvonne Nikora, Deputy principal at Waerenga o Kuri School, explains how the Māori achieving success as Māori (MASAM) framework has influenced her teaching. She describes using technologies to enable students as they create a story of their turangawaewae. For students, the result of this authentic learning context has been developing a sense of belonging and ownership.

Māori achieving succes as Māori – MASAM
Information about MASAM, how it intersects with e-learning, and how you can support Māori students to achieve success.

Supporting Māori students through ako-e (e-learning)
School stories demonstrating how e-learning tools can be used to build relationships and engage with Māori learners, whānau, and iwi.

Te ika unahi nui wānanga – A marae-based learning programme
This approach focuses on:

  • strengthening the relationship between the school, whānau, and the local marae
  • providing marae-based learning to strengthen cultural identity
  • introducing digital technologies to support learning and literacy.

Te Kotahitanga
A research and professional development programme that supports teachers to improve Māori students' learning and achievement. 

Treaty resource centre: Ngā Rerenga o Te Tiriti
A resource to help community organisations in engaging with the Treaty. Access free courses  educational resources  and a digital library .

Teachers from Pegasus Bay School discuss how introducing waiata, students learning their pepeha, and rakau games has created an inclusive environment where tikanga Māori is celebrated and valued.

Hītori Māori/Māori history
Programme designs for Māori history in years 1-8 and 9-13, along with New Zealand Curriculum and NCEA links, resources, and learning experiences. These have been designed to guide students and teachers when looking at Māori history in a local context. 

Tātaiako: Cultural competencies for teachers of Māori learners  
A resource supporting teachers to personalise learning for, and with, Māori learners, to ensure they enjoy educational success as Māori.

The Māori Education Strategy: Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success 2013–2017
The Ministry of Education strategy for rapidly changing how the education system performs for Māori students.

Teachers from Pegasus Bay School share how they incorporate te reo Māori into the classroom – in particular through karakia, pepeha, music, and games.

Māori resources

Links to classroom teaching resources to support building te reo Māori and tikanga Māori for all ākonga.

Reo Māori resources
Links to online resources designed for teachers and students to develop te reo Māori.

He Kupu o te Rā
In-depth instructions for using macrons in email, text messages, documents, and websites.

Blended e-learning for Māori and Pasifika learners
This group in the VLN has a wealth of resources to support teaching and learning.

Standard 2: Professional learning

Use inquiry, collaborative problem-solving and professional learning to improve professional capability to impact on the learning and achievement of all learners.

Elaboration of the standard
  • Inquire into and reflect on the effectiveness of practice in an ongoing way, using evidence from a range of sources.
  • Critically examine how my own assumptions and beliefs, including cultural beliefs, impact on practice and the achievement of learners with different abilities and needs, backgrounds, genders, identities, languages and cultures.
  • Engage in professional learning and adaptively apply this learning in practice.
  • Be informed by research and innovations related to: content disciplines; pedagogy; teaching for diverse learners including learners with disabilities and learning support needs; and wider education matters.
  • Seek and respond to feedback from learners, colleagues and other education professionals, and engage in collaborative problem-solving and learning-focused collegial discussions.

Tātaiako competencies

  • Ako – I take responsibility for my own learning and that of Māori learners.
  • Wānanga – I participate with learners and communicate in robust dialogue for the benefit of Māori learners’ achievement.

Teacher inquiry is an evidence-based process that allows teachers to trial new pedagogies and tools in relation to the needs of their class. It can be a powerful tool for implementing e-learning in the classroom.

Principal at Konini School, Michael Malins, shares how they facilitate and keep record of teacher inquiry.

Whole-school PD at Wairakei School, using the Teaching as Inquiry model, is focused on using the SAMR model to develop the use of digital technologies to improve learner outcomes.

Teaching as inquiry
School stories and resources to support using the Teaching as Inquiry framework with an e-learning lens.

The SAMR model
A framework to assess and evaluate technologies used in the classroom.

Teacher inquiry snapshots  
Short descriptions of teacher inquiries into e-learning tools and practises using the Spirals of Inquiry model.

Future-focused learning | Professional development
Examples of professional learning approaches and teacher inquiries at Newmarket and Leamington schools.

Data analysis  
Collecting, interpreting, and visualising data for use in teacher inquiry.

Our assumptions and beliefs impact on our practice and the achievement of ākonga. Planning for the needs of diverse learners from the outset is an essential part of inclusive practice. Identify how digital technologies can be utilised to remove barriers for learning and allow students to engage in ways that meet their needs.

Nicky Lewis, e-Learning teacher at Ashburton College, explains how she presents content in a variety of ways to make it accessible for all students.

Inclusive classrooms
Inclusive pedagogy is focused on including all students in learning. This section of the website provides information and examples of using digital technologies to support inclusion.

Inclusive education: Guides for schools
Practical strategies, suggestions, and resources to support teaching learners with diverse needs.

Online Communities of Practice provide teachers with access to discussions, shared expertise, and resources.

Josie Woon, Assistant Principal at Takaro School, shares how the Enabling e-Learning community in the Virtual Learning Network has helped her integrate technology into her class by enabling her to connect with other "expert" teachers.

Sonya van Schaijik, Newmarket School, explains how TeachMeet works. TeachMeetNZ  is part of the TeachMeet international  movement, which provides teachers with an online space to share their learning. It allows teachers to make online connections outside of their own schools so they can collaborate and broaden their professional networks and knowledge. Once a term, teachers come together in a Google Hangout to share what they are doing in their classrooms. Sessions are live-streamed via YouTube. Participants can use Google Hangout’s question and answer tool, Twitter, to interact. Presentations are archived so that they can be viewed at any time. 

Coaching and mentoring
Examples of teachers working with literacy coaches and using e-learning approaches to develop student literacy. 

Professional learning communities
Information about professional learning communities and tips for getting started on developing your own. Use the links on the Resources tab , under the heading "Online professional learning communities" to join PLCs relevant to your role.

The Virtual Learning Network  (VLN)
The VLN is an online community provided by the Ministry of Education for all New Zealand educators. Members are able to create groups in order to build communities of practice around common areas of interest. Join the Enabling e-Learning community  within the VLN.

edSpace
An online network for educators throughout New Zealand to connect, share knowledge, and grow capabilities.

Connected educator
A collaborative calendar connects thousands of educators so they can engage in free (and freely given) online professional learning.

8 characteristics of connected educators
Steve Anderson discusses what it means to be a connected educator.

Meetup   
Find other educators in your neighbourhood that share your interests. Use Meetup to find, join, and organise face-to-face professional development groups and communities. Pakuranga College teachers used the Auckland game developers meetup  to support students in developing their virtual reality game. Read about this on the Virtual reality  page. 

10 ways teachers can use Twitter for professional development  
This post by Educational Technology and Mobile Learning outlines how to use Twitter to connect with the wider educational community.

Engaging with research makes you evaluate your teaching methods and the reasons behind them.

Teacher inquiry snapshots
Examples of NZ teachers using an inquiry model to trial new pedagogical approaches supported by the use of digital technologies.

Research and readings
A collection of e-learning related articles to inform classroom practice.

Education counts – e-Learning publications
Current research on e-learning practices in New Zealand educational contexts.

EPIC  
EPIC provides New Zealand schools with free access to a worldwide range of databases containing thousands of international and New Zealand magazines, newspapers, biographies, substantial reference works, and images. You will need to apply for a username and password providing proof that you are teaching in a New Zealand educational institution.

ERO – Publications  
ERO's evaluation indicators and frameworks, national evaluations, resources, effective practice reports, and guides.

BES – (Iterative Best Evidence Synthesis) Programme  
BES is a collaborative knowledge building strategy designed to strengthen the evidence base that informs education policy and practice in New Zealand. Find resources and publications in this section of education counts. 

NZCER  
A hub for independent educational research in New Zealand.

Free PLD opportunities to support NZ teachers to build their e-learning capability.

Enabling e-learning community: Group calendar  
Sign up for the free webinars aimed at school leaders and teachers accessed through this community. The calendar also provides links to e-learning conferences and other learning opportunities for educators.

Online numeracy PD  
There are online modules and tutorials for teachers to upskill in teaching numeracy. They are Online numeracy PD  and numeracy content tutorials .

The e-Learning Planning Framework  
Teachers can use the descriptors in the teaching and learning dimension of the e-Learning Planning Framework (eLPF) to assess and develop their e-capability.

Digital citizenship modules
These self-paced modules can be used for professional development. Each module contains different activities that include questions for reflection. These can be worked through individually or with your colleagues. The modules are designed to be flexible. Select the content that is relevant to you from each of them.

K12 online conference  
This free annual conference focuses on innovative ways Web 2.0 tools and technologies can be used to improve learning.

Standard 3: Professional relationships

Establish and maintain professional relationships and behaviours focused on the learning and well-being of each learner.

Elaboration of the standard
  • Engage in reciprocal, collaborative, learning-focused relationships with: 
    • learners, family, and whānau
    • teaching colleagues, support staff, and other professionals
    • agencies, groups, and individuals in the community.
  • Communicate effectively with others.
  • Actively contribute, and work collegially, in the pursuit of improving my own and organisational practice, showing leadership, particularly in areas of responsibility.
  • Communicate clear and accurate assessment for learning and achievement information.

Tātaiako competencies

  • Whanaungatanga – I actively engage in respectful working relationships with Māori Learners, parents and whānau, hāpu, iwi and the Māori community.
  • Manaakitanga – I demonstrate integrity, sincerity, and respect towards Māori beliefs, language, and culture.

Students can use e-learning tools to share information about themselves providing a way for teachers to connect with them and discover some insights into who they are.

Students at Burnham School found the process of creating and sharing a mihi using a blog a valuable experience.

Point England School student, Toreka’s mihi  
Example of a student’s digital mihi.

Support students to develop their own learner profiles  
Develop learner profiles by using blogs, videos, and presentation tools.

Use tools such as as Answer GardenPadlet , and Survey Monkey  to provide students with opportunities to contribute ideas and opinions.

Digital technologies are powerful and effective tools for sharing information and engaging parents and whānau with their child's work and classroom experiences.

Wairakei School principal, Shane Buckner explains the benefits of using digital technologies to build connections with parents and whānau.

Coastal Taranaki School teacher, Chris Luke explains the importance of marae-based learning and how he connects that with learning in the classroom.

Engaging with the community
Practical examples and information to support using digital technologies to engage and communicate with parents, whānau, and the wider community.

e-Portfolios  
e-Portfolios enable parents/whānau to participate and provide feedback on their child's learning anytime. The school stories on the e-portfolios page, supported by information and resources, provide examples of different tools and approaches to setting them up and engaging parents/whānau and the wider community.

Collaborating to support learning using Blogger
Melville Intermediate School used a combination of blogging, Skype, and other digital tools to engage support and receive feedback from audiences outside of the classroom.

Using social media to connect with your community
Starting points and support for using social media to engage with your community. 

Connecting with Pasifika families and communities
Information, resources, and examples for schools seeking to build effective relationships with Pasifika communities. 

Beyond the classroom – Connecting home and school
An online discussion group in the VLN focusing on using digital technologies to connect home and school.

Building horizontal connections using digital technologies
VLN forum discussing principal number 7 of the 7 Principals of Learning: Building horizontal connections.

A Marae-based learning programme
An overview of the Marae-based learning programme at Coastal Taranaki School.

The development of an innovative learning environment (ILE) means your approach to teaching can be much more collaborative and flexible. Consider how digital technologies can support:

  • communication between team members
  • planning collaboratively
  • assessment – creating effective systems and sharing data.

Lisa Dovey, year 7–8 team leader at Halswell School, discusses the benefits of collaborative teaching. Her team uses Google Docs and Google Hangouts to support collaborative planning, teaching, and assessment. She explains, "We do a lot of planning together, which is really fantastic. It means that all of our strengths are put together." 

Engaging in professional learning with your colleagues provides support and rich discussions.

All the teachers at Pegasus Bay School participated in the online Te Reo Puāwai course. They discuss the benefits of whole-staff PLD.

Innovative learning environments | Getting started in an ILE
Practical information and examples of teachers collaborating to develop an inclusive, ILE.

Allister Williamson describes his role as e-Learning coordinator at Pakuranga College, which involves overseeing their professional learning programme.

Leadership
Information, school stories, and resources to support leaders in planning for and implementing e-learning initiatives in their school.

Leading e-learning | Role of the e-leader
Information and school examples that support developing e-leaders. 

Enabling e-Learning: Leadership community
Join this group in the Virtual Learning Network (VLN) to participate in discussions and share resources focused on supporting school leaders to lead change and develop vision, policy, and strategy to integrate ICTs into learning.

Culturally responsive leadership
Using digital technologies to foster culturally responsive change and leadership.

Strong leadership of e-learning
Lyn Ross from the Te Apiti ICT PD Cluster outlines the development of strong leadership in e-learning within their cluster. The rationale and process are supported by video clips from the principals and lead teachers sharing their practice.

ICT lead teacher wiki
Suzie Vesper's wiki has a number of tips and resources on how to lead ICT effectively in a school.

Parents of Hampden Street School students, explain how blogging and e-portfolios work to help them stay connected with their children's learning.  

e-Portfolios
Students can be given responsibility for their own learning by documenting their progress towards learning goals and deciding on what work to share.

SMS – Supporting learner pathways
This section offers guidance on using data to support students as they move through school, between schools, and beyond school.

Starpath Project Toolkit  
Provides a large number of resources to help with:

The Mutakaroa project
The Mutukaroa project is a home-school learning partnership that seeks to accelerate learning progress and achievement for students in years 1, 2, and 3 by seeking to foster the active engagement of parents and whānau in learning partnerships. 

Reporting to parents and whānau
Up-to-date resources supporting schools to share information with parents and whānau.

Assessment Resource Bank
The ARBs consist of 1246 assessment resources in English, Mathematics, and Science. These are for students working at levels 2–5 in New Zealand classrooms. NZCER have re-developed 150 resources into an interactive online format. To register, go to http://live.arb.nzcer.org.nz  and create your unique account.

Standard 4: Learning-focused culture

Develop a culture which is focused on learning, and is characterised by respect, inclusion, empathy, collaboration, and safety.

Elaboration of the standard
  • Develop learning-focused relationships with learners, enabling them to be active participants in the process of learning, sharing ownership and responsibility for learning.
  • Foster trust, respect, and cooperation with and among learners so that they experience an environment in which it is safe to take risks.
  • Demonstrate high expectations for the learning outcomes of all learners, including for those learners with disabilities or learning support needs.
  • Manage the learning setting to ensure access to learning for all and to maximise learners’ physical, social, cultural and emotional safety.
  • Create an environment where learners can be confident in their identities, languages, cultures, and abilities.
  • Develop an environment where the diversity and uniqueness of all learners is accepted and valued.
  • Meet relevant regulatory, statutory, and professional requirements.

Tātaiako competencies

  • Manaakitanga – I demonstrate integrity, sincerity, and respect towards Māori beliefs, language, and culture.
  • Ako – I take responsibility for my own learning and that of Māori learners.
  • Tangata whenuatanga – I affirm Māori learners as Māori. I provide contexts for learning where the identity, language, and culture of Māori learners and their whānau is affirmed.

Consider how you can enable learners to be active participants in the process of learning, sharing ownership and responsibility for learning.

Year 5 and 6 students at Hampden Street School talk about the positive impact student agency is having on their learning, how it’s changing their interactions with teachers and classmates, and the resulting lift in their motivation, engagement, and achievement.

Using digital technologies to support learner agency
This section of Enabling e-Learning contains approaches, pedagogy, and tools relating to learner agency.

Digital citizenship involves students being digitally literate, confident, and capable users of ICT who know how to protect themselves and respect others in online spaces. Students should demonstrate values and key competencies from The New Zealand Curriculum in their use of digital tools and when re-using digital content. Teachers have a significant role to play in developing these skills with students.

Staff and students from Apiti School explain some of the practical strategies they have put in place to ensure they are safe and responsible digital citizens.

Digital citizenship
Use the information, school stories, and resources on this page to develop your understanding of digital citizenship and ways to integrate this teaching into your classroom. 

Digital citizenship modules
These free self-paced learning modules can be used for professional development. They contain information and useful links for teaching and learning in the classroom as well as providing information for parents and caregivers.

Using social media to connect with your community | Resources
A comprehensive list of resources to support safe and responsible use of social media.

NetSafe
NetSafe has a comprehensive range of information and resources to support schools and teachers to develop policies and practices that ensure a safe digital environment.

Creative commons Aotearoa New Zealand
Information about creative commons licences and policies for schools.

Connected and confident: What does digital citizenship look like in our increasingly connected world?
A November 2012 Slideshare presentation by Suzie Vesper that provides useful information and links to resources.

Irongate School has a focus on improving student literacy levels particularly for their large population of Māori and Pasifika students. The tuakana-teina relationship provided the model for the buddy system they are using.

Students from Ruawai Primary School and their teacher talk about how they are developing key competencies through writing collaborations.

Kurt Soares and Kirsty Soames, from South New Brighton School, describe how they started team teaching and constructed a collaborative space from a traditional classroom with their students.

Innovative learning environments
This section of the website offers an overview of how learning spaces can be adapted to the future-focused changes occurring in education.

Google apps
Information, school stories, and resources explaining how to use Google Apps for collaborating and improving learning outcomes.   

Blogs  
Information, school stories, and resources explaining how to blog and demonstrating the benefits of blogging to student engagement, motivation, and learning outcomes.

New technologies and collaborative process
VLN forum discussing the tools and practises used by educators to foster collaborative approaches to the learning process.

6 Ways Google Docs supports collaboration in the writing process
An outline of how Google Docs can be used for students to participate in digital writing workshops that combine peer editing with cooperative grouping.

5 examples of collaborative teaching in K-12 classrooms
Five examples of collaborative teaching in classrooms in this article from Channel pro network.   

Voicethread for digital conversations
A resource looking at how the online oral language tool VoiceThread can be used to engage students in learning conversations where they value and respect each other’s contributions.

Blogging to increase writing achievement
This video contains an explanation of the Summer Learning Journey blogging project undertaken by Rachel Williams. 

Plan for the needs of all learners from the outset

Consider how you can create an environment where learners can be confident in their identities, languages, cultures, and abilities. Use your knowledge of the varied strengths, interests, and needs of ākonga to plan a programme that includes all students from the outset.

Kate Friedwald explains how she uses a Universal Design for Learning (UDL) approach in her classroom. Teaching is based on students' specific needs and learning activities are differentiated and personalised for each learner.

Wairakei School teacher, Kate Friewald describes how she uses Google Docs to support differentiated learning in her classroom.

Inclusion
The New Zealand Curriculum principle of inclusion. Information and links to tools, examples, and resources.

Inclusive classrooms
This section of the website contains information, resources, and examples for including all students in learning.

Inclusive education guides for schools
This site provides New Zealand educators with practical strategies, suggestions, and resources to support the diverse needs of all learners.

Assistive technology
Information, school stories, and resources focused on using assistive technologies to improve learning outcomes for students.

Enabling e-learning: Teaching community
Join this group in the Virtual Learning Network (VLN) to explore how and why we use ICTs to support effective teaching and learning. The discussion thread What it looks like  is focused on what inclusive practices look like.

BLENNZ Learning Library
A collection of stories written by BLENNZ educators for parents, whānau (family), and colleagues about children and young people who are blind, deafblind, or have low vision. Many of the stories show the use of technology to support student learning.

Univeral Design for Learning (UDL)
This section of the website contains information about UDL – a research-based set of principles for curriculum development that give all individuals equal opportunities to learn – and the e-learning tools that can help to achieve them.  

Cast
Cast contains research, case studies, and learning tools designed to help educators use UDL to improve learning opportunities for all individuals.  

Digital learning objects
The digital learning objects within the NZ Maths  website have different versions to allow for differentiation to meet the needs of learners. 

Child-led learning with ICT
In this article from Teach Primary, teacher Kevin McLaughlin outlines how he is using technology to personalise work for each of his students.

ICT and the visual learner
This wiki page by Andrew Churches looks at how visual learners can be supported with e-learning. There are pages for other learning styles on the wiki.

Multiple intelligences and technology
Resources to help explore how using technology can support learners with strengths in different areas.

Learning with digital technologies for gifted Māori and Pasifika learners
A space for any educators who wish to engage in the discussions and resources that are shared for gifted Māori and Pasifika learners.

Tamaki College teacher, Noelene Dunn describes how she changed her classroom into a flexible learning space and the digital technologies she uses to support learning.

Innovative learning environments
An explanation and examples of the pedagogical, environmental, and technological aspects of developing and collaborating in innovative learning environments. 

Planning an innovative learning environment
This guide on the Inclusive Education website provides strategies and suggestions for developing innovative learning environments (ILE) that work for all learners. 

Teacher inquiries at Newmarket School build on learner motivation and interests as a way of improving student outcomes.

Curriculum areas
Use this section of enabling e-Learning to find effective learning approaches using digital tools across the curriculum learning areas.

Digital fluency
Information and resources on how to foster digital fluency among students in order to achieve desired learning outcomes.

e-Competencies
Kellie McRobert explains e-competencies and how they are aligned with the NZ Curriculum key competencies. She shares stories of her classroom practice with supporting research.

Bloom's digital taxonomy
Infographic made by GlobalDigitalCitizen based on Andrew Churches' revised take on Bloom's taxonomy.

Snapshots of learning
Snapshots of learning are examples of effective classroom practice describing the use of digital technologies to support learning and teaching, with links to supporting resources. More snapshots are in the Software for Learning group  in the VLN.

Standard 5: Design for learning

Design learning based on curriculum and pedagogical knowledge, assessment information and an understanding of each learner’s strengths, interests, needs, identity, language and cultures.

Elaboration of the standard
  • Select teaching approaches, resources, and learning and assessment activities based on a thorough knowledge of curriculum content, pedagogy, progressions in learning and the learners.
  • Gather, analyse, and use appropriate assessment information, identifying progress and needs of learners to design clear next steps in learning and to identify additional supports or adaptations that may be required.
  • Design and plan culturally responsive, evidence-based approaches which reflect the local community and Te Tiriti o Waitangi partnership in New Zealand.
  • Harness the rich capital that learners bring by providing culturally responsive and engaging contexts for learners.
  • Design learning that is informed by national policies and priorities.

Tātaiako competencies

  • Ako – I take responsibility for my own learning and that of Māori learners.
  • Tangata whenuatanga  I affirm Māori learners as Māori. I provide contexts for learning where the identity, language, and culture of Māori learners and their whānau is affirmed.
  • Wānanga – I participate with learners and communicate in robust dialogue for the benefit of Māori learners’ achievement.

When planning inclusive learning programmes, consider the needs of all ākonga. Identify the barriers to learning and plan to remove/reduce these so all ākonga can participate and experience success.

Teacher, Kate Friedwald explains how careful and consistent presentation of visual information and classroom organisation supported by technology is designed to foster independent learning in Felix, a student with dyslexia. Felix and his mother Julia discuss the benefits of Kate's approach.

The learning progression frameworks
The frameworks show the steps that learners take as they develop in reading, writing, and mathematics from Years 1–10, and clarify the expected knowledge and skills in Years 9 and 10, to support success in NCEA and beyond.

Enabling e-Learning: Teaching  
This section of the website provides stories, information, and resources that explore teacher practice and using e-learning across the curriculum. It includes:

Future-focused learning
The future-focused learning section of enabling e-Learning provides an overview of teaching approaches designed for 21st century learning. It includes:

Inclusive classrooms
This section of the website contains information, resources, and examples for including all students in learning.

Best evidence synthesis (BES): e-Learning
This section of BES links to resources and readings surrounding the use of technology in education policy and practise in New Zealand.

e-Learning tools enable you to easily gather and share assessment information in ways that advance the learning of students.

Assessment and e-learning
Information, resources, and school stories highlighting e-Learning tools that enable you to easily gather and share assessment information in ways that advance the learning of students.

PaCT
The Progress and Consistency Tool is an online tool that supports professional judgments in reading, writing, and mathematics.

e-asTTle  
An online assessment tool for assessing students’ achievement and progress in reading, mathematics, writing, and in pānui, pāngarau, and tuhituhi.

Using digital technologies to support learning in a senior secondary context | Digital assessment
Information, resources, and examples illustrating how NZ secondary schools use digital technologies for assessment in the NCEA years.

e-Portfolios
Examples of how e-portfolios are used for learners to record their goals, achievements, and reflect on their learning.

SMS – Supporting learner pathways
Guidance on using data to support students as they move through school, between schools, and beyond school.

Managing student data 
This guide offers schools starting points for the effective management and use of data. It focuses on using Student Management Systems (SMSs) effectively so that learning is informed by accurate, rich information.

Assessment tool selector  
A resource for teachers and schools to help them select the most appropriate assessment tool to suit their particular purpose.

Starpath Project Toolkit  
Provides a large number of resources to help with:

Assessment Resource Bank
The ARBs consist of 1246 assessment resources in English, Mathematics, and Science. These are for students working at levels 2–5 in New Zealand classrooms. NZCER have re-developed 150 resources into an interactive, online format. To register, go to http://live.arb.nzcer.org.nz  and create your unique account.

Assessment for learning  
Assessment for learning is best described as a process by which assessment information is used by teachers to adjust their teaching strategies, and by students to adjust their learning strategies.

Successful learning for ākonga Māori is founded on language, culture, and values. It builds on what we know to be effective curriculum and pedagogy in that cultural context. e-Learning approaches that are successful for Māori students work "within a Māori framework that emphasises and values" (NZCER, 2004 ).

In planning for Māori to achieve success as Māori, Paul and Shelley Cornwall describe the changes they have made to their teaching approach at Motu School. The Māori achieving success as Māori (MASAM) document gave them a starting point. Taking an inclusive approach, considering students' cultural backgrounds, and incorporating te reo Māori across the school curriculum has impacted on student learning.

Māori achieving succes as Māori – MASAM
Information about MASAM, how it intersects with e-learning, and how it can help Māori students to achieve educative success in our schools.

Te ika unahi nui wānanga – A marae-based learning programme
Te Ika Unahi Nui is a marae-based wānanga (learning programme) that was developed and trialled with students from Coastal Taranaki School at Puniho Pā, Tarawainuku marae in Okato, Taranaki.

Supporting Māori students
Information and practical examples of planning and using culturally responsive, evidence-based approaches which reflect the local community and Te Tiriti o Waitangi partnership in New Zealand.

Te Kotahitanga
A research and professional development programme that supports teachers to improve Māori students' learning and achievement.

Supporting Māori students
This guide on the Inclusive Education website provides teaching and learning strategies that can be used in the classroom to create a more effective learning environment for all Māori students. Strengthening the self-identity and self-esteem of students who may need additional support to learn is a central theme.

Creating culturally responsive learning environments and contexts for all ākonga  
Culturally responsive pedagogy in the arts is discussed in this section of the senior secondary curriculum guide on TKI.

The New Zealand Curriculum  and Te Marautanga o Aotearoa  set out a vision for all of our young people to become confident, connected, actively involved lifelong learners.

Strategies and policies
Ministry of Education policies and strategies focusing on building an education system that provides all New Zealanders with the knowledge, skills, and values to be successful citizens in the 21st century.

Priority learners
Information, school stories, and links to resources that support successful planning and teaching of priority learners.

Ministry of Education: Statement of intent 2012–2017 (PDF 890KB)  
Key elements of how the Ministry will contribute to the delivery of the Government’s priorities for education. A PDF of the Statement is available for download from this page on the Ministry of Education website.

Success for all – every school, every child
The Government’s vision and work programme to achieve a fully inclusive education system. Downloadable PDFs Success for all fact sheet  and Success for all Q and A sheet  are on this page of the Ministry of Education website.

Towards digital fluency
The Ministry of Education outlines a range of initiatives for Digital Technologies in Education to ensure all New Zealand schools are equipped with state-of-the-art infrastructure, teachers get the support and resources they need to be digitally fluent, and every student benefits from the advantages of digital technologies for learning.

Standard 6: Teaching

Teach and respond to learners in a knowledgeable and adaptive way to progress their learning at an appropriate depth and pace.

Elaboration of the standard
  • Teach in ways that ensure all learners are making sufficient progress, monitor the extent and pace of learning, focusing on equity and excellence for all.
  • Specifically support the educational aspirations for Māori learners, taking shared responsibility for these learners to achieve educational success as Māori.
  • Use an increasing repertoire of teaching strategies, approaches, learning activities, technologies, and assessment for learning strategies and modify these in response to the needs of individuals and groups of learners.
  • Provide opportunities and support for learners to engage with, practise, and apply learning to different contexts and make connections with prior learning.
  • Teach in ways that enable learners to learn from one another, to collaborate, to self-regulate, and to develop agency over their learning.
  • Ensure learners receive ongoing feedback and assessment information and support them to use this information to guide further learning.

Tātaiako competencies

  • Ako  I take responsibility for my own learning and that of Māori learners.
  • Wānanga  I participate with learners and communicate in robust dialogue for the benefit of Māori learners’ achievement.

Universal Design for Learning (UDL) supports the design of the least restrictive learning environments for students. Barriers are minimised. Learning supports and flexibility are built in to the environment from the outset. It is not a single, one-size-fits-all solution.

Use digital technologies to:

  • remove barriers to learning
  • provide ākonga with flexible approaches that can be customised and adjusted for individual needs.  

Teacher, Kate Friedwald explains how she uses a UDL approach in her classroom. Teaching is based on students' specific needs and learning activities are differentiated and personalised for each learner.

Universal Design for Learning
UDL explained with classroom examples of how digital technologies can be used to remove barriers to learning and create flexible approaches.

Flipped learning
Information and practical examples of how to flip learning in your classroom.

Using digital technologies to support learning in a senior secondary context
Suggestions, resources, and examples illustrating how NZ secondary teachers use digital technologies to extend and enhance learning in the NCEA years.

Universal Design for Learning
This online guide introduces the UDL approach and illustrates the UDL Guidelines in an Aotearoa New Zealand context.

Student, Herepo Wynyard talks about how the involvement of her whānau both online (through her e-portfolio), and face-to-face at school has encouraged success with her learning goals.

Māori achieving success as Māori (MASAM)
Information about MASAM, how it intersects with e-learning, and how it can help Māori students to achieve educative success in our schools.

Te ika unahi nui wānanga – A marae-based learning programme
Te Ika Unahi Nui is a marae-based wānanga (learning programme) that was developed and trialled with students from Coastal Taranaki School at Puniho Pā, Tarawainuku marae in Okato, Taranaki.

Supporting Māori students through ako-e (e-learning)
Information and practical examples of planning and using culturally responsive, evidence-based approaches which reflect the local community and Te Tiriti o Waitangi partnership in New Zealand.

Te Kotahitanga
A research and professional development programme that supports teachers to improve Māori students' learning and achievement.

Supporting Māori students
Teaching and learning strategies for teachers to create a more effective learning environment for all Māori students. Strengthening the self-identity and self-esteem of students who may need additional support to learn is a central theme in this online guide on the Inclusive Education website.

At Houghton Valley School, teacher and e-learning leader, Peter Holmstead inquired into using Google apps to improve learning outcomes. He focused on four students who were high achievers.

Gifted and talented online
This TKI site supports schools, teachers, students, and parents in assisting gifted and talented students to reach their full potential academically, emotionally, and socially.

Learning with digital technologies for gifted Māori and Pasifika learners
A space for any educators who wish to engage in the discussions and resources that are shared for gifted Māori and Pasifika learners. 

Critical evaluation of information
Students need to be able to critically evaluate the validity of what they find on the web. With an emphasis on individual research for GAT students, this becomes crucial. The resources on this page can help them to do this.

"The more educators give students choice, control, challenge, and collaborative opportunities, the more motivation and engagement are likely to rise."

Toshalis & Nakkula, 2012

Scott McKenzie (senior syndicate leader) and Don McLean (principal) explain how they have been working towards their goal of building learner agency and using digital technologies to support that.

The Portal Unity Project from CORE Ministry Video on Vimeo.

Year 13 student Daniel Cowpertwait describes his Portal Unity Project. This is a "mod" for the online game Portal he has developed along with three other students as part of the Impact Project at Albany Senior High School. Daniel describes how the cross curricular nature of the project has opened his eyes to the way different disciplines can be combined into a career.

Using digital technologies to support learner agency
Strategies for using digital technologies to support learner agency.

Judy Delbridge broadens thinking around data collection, allowing her students to produce creative results.

Kate Friedwald, teacher at Wairakei School, describes how students in her classroom use iPads to engage in independent, self-directed learning.

e-Portfolios
Students can be given responsibility for their own learning by documenting their progress towards learning goals and deciding on what work to share.

Teachers at Taupaki School explain how their makerspace encourages students to collaborate effectively and the benefits they have seen from this.

Makerspaces
A description of the pedagogy and technology underpinning makerspaces in New Zealand schools. 

Students from Pakuranga College describe the VR game they created as a collaborative project, and the skills they developed through the process.

Virtual reality
Find out how to get started with Virtual Reality in your school. 

Authentic learning focuses on real-world, complex problems and their solutions.

Taupaki School principal, Stephen Lethbridge, and students talk about how they solved real problems in their school during their makerspace learning.

Project-based learning
Authentic, project-based learning allows students to address challenges that are real to them and their lives.

Makerspaces
A description of the pedagogy and technology underpinning makerspaces in New Zealand schools.

Newmarket school teacher, Virginia Kung talks about how they have made connections with people across the world through Twitter and Skype.

St Hilda's Collegiate e-learning leader, Carla Joint talks about the benefits of technology in learning languages. It has enabled students to work at their own pace, direct their learning, use authentic material, and communicate with overseas students. Find out more on the Learning Languages page .

Beyond the classroom
Information and examples of using technologies to engage the community and extend learning beyond the classroom.

Project-based learning
Authentic, project-based learning allows students to address challenges that are real to them and their lives.

Meetup   
Pakuranga College teachers used the Auckland game developers meetup  to support students to develop their virtual reality game. Read about this on the Virtual reality  page.

Education council logo

Our Code, Our Standards  
The Code of Professional Responsibility and Standards for the Teaching Profession combines and replaces the Practising Teacher Criteria and the Code of Ethics for Certified Teachers.

The Leadership Strategy for the teaching profession of Aotearoa New Zealand
The Leadership Strategy supports the growth and development of leadership capability for all registered teachers across English medium and Māori medium settings, in positional and non-positional roles. It sets out a guiding framework for teachers to develop their leadership capability – aiming to make leadership development accessible to everyone.

The Educational Leadership Capability Framework
The Capability Framework is designed to support the Leadership Strategy. It outlines the core educational capabilities needed for effective leadership across different levels of the profession. The Capability Framework provides all teachers with a practical tool to identify, grow, and develop their leadership capability. It illustrates what leadership looks like in practice, in kura, schools, and early childhood education services.

e-Learning community discussions

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