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The strategic thinking roadmap – supporting the development of your digital technologies action plan

This guide is designed to help your leadership team implement a strategic direction that ensures technologies are integrated into a school-wide drive for effective teaching and learning.

Using the guide

This guide will help your school/kura think strategically about the effective use of digital technologies.

It is intended:

  • to support principals, and the team leading your strategic discussions, to develop your school’s Goals and actions template
  • to help those using the e-Learning Planning Framework (eLPF) or the Maori Medium elearning Planning Framework (MMeLPF) respond to identified priorities.
  • for those leading a Community of Learning that wants to consider the advantages of a community-wide strategy leveraging digital technologies.

Connected Learning Advisor, Charles Newton explains how to use this guide to support developing your digital technologies goals and actions.

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Getting started

two primary school students with iPad

We suggest you:

Step 1. Watch the video above to get an overview of the process. Then look at the different tabs to get a feel for this guide’s structure and the resources available to help you.

Step 2. Assemble your team. This could include interested senior management, teachers, students, parents, and community members able to bring a diverse but informed perspective to your deliberations.

Step 3. Understand the context by working through both the Rationale for planning  and the 10 Tips for success .

Step 4. Become familiar with the Roadmap templates. The Developing your plan tab contains all the templates and a video demonstrating how to use them to support your planning process.

Step 5. Begin your strategic discussions. Work as a team and with your stakeholders. Download The Roadmap worksheet and use it to gather information about your progress against each of the eight planning strands .

The Roadmap Worksheet.pdf (PDF, 129.18 kB)
  • The Roadmap worksheet is an interactive PDF.
  • You must open The Roadmap worksheet using Adobe Reader to be able to save your work on the PDF.
  • If you are using an iPad, you will need to use a PDF reader app to open, type into, and save the PDF.

Step 6. Collate your key findings from these deliberations on the Roadmap discussion summary  which is designed to capture the essence of your discussions and investigations.

Step 7. Develop your goals and actions by taking the actions and emerging goals you have identified on The Roadmap worksheet and breaking these out in greater detail using the Goals and actions template .

Step 8. Complete your plan. Together your “Roadmap discussion summary” and “Digital Technologies Plan” provide a concise, accessible document to share with your Board, staff, students and community.

CLA Advisor, Charles Newton explains ten key considerations for successful planning.

  1. Start by building a collaborative culture. Collaborative and shared leadership that is transparent to all staff, students, and the community provides a powerful conduit for change.
  2. Build a team. Developing future-focused capacity requires a collaborative effort. Your school or community needs a committed group of leaders, teachers, students, and community members united in a common purpose.
  3. Fully engage all the stakeholders – especially teachers and students, but also parents, whānau, community, and business interests. It’s important to hear a range of perspectives about the use of digital technologies in education.
  4. Develop a cohesive plan. Strategic planning is the systematic process of: 
    • envisioning a desired future
    • translating this vision into broadly defined goals
    • determining a sequence of steps to achieve these.
  5. Rethink the need for an e-learning strategic plan. Increasingly, schools have one overarching strategic plan focusing on their teaching, learning, and achievement goals. This is supported by a series of action plans detailing how the various dimensions such as professional development, property, and digital technology contribute to those overarching intentions.
  6. There is no easy answer and no short cuts. You have to work with your school and community to co-construct a plan that people feel they own. This requires a structured and thorough process. Allocate the time and resources to ensure its success.
  7. Tap into the knowledge and experiences of your teaching and research peers across the sector. It’s always useful to bounce your ideas off others. Collaborate with your peers. Look to work in partnership with other schools. Connect to professional networks to tap into the “wisdom of the crowd” through:
    • conversations
    • Twitter
    • conferences 
    • school visits
    • research
    • debates
    • inquiries 
  8. Incorporate expert mentoring and support. As you will be investing considerable time and effort in this process, it might be wise to engage a “critical friend” – someone to look over your shoulder, challenge your assumptions, and provide both expert knowledge and different perspectives to enrich your conversations and decisions.
  9. Only add something more useful – and always try to take something away! Teachers are already overloaded. Plan to add value by introducing interventions that improve their effectiveness, increase efficiencies, and reduce workload. 
  10. Monitor your progress and evaluate the impact of your interventions and your broader plan. You need to know if your strategies are being implemented effectively and are improving student learning.
More information »

Responding to the 21st century imperative demands a significant rethink of how to harness the unprecedented opportunities the digital environment now offers.

Planning for the use of digital technologies must serve highly effective teaching and learning.

This is a complex challenge but you don’t have to work alone.

Education is facing a significant challenge in determining what teaching and learning needs to look like in our rapidly changing world.

“The science of learning underscores the importance of rethinking what is taught, how it is taught and how learning is assessed.”

OECD, (2012). The nature of learning using research to inspire practice: Practitioner guide

Digital technologies have a pivotal role to play. They are a major enabler of the forces reshaping how our society and economy function. The smart use of digital technologies has enormous potential to help us recast the key principles, relationships, partnerships, and components integral to successful learning environments.

An increasingly coherent set of key themes is emerging from innovative schools that highlight what is needed to design effective, learner-centred education. This suggests the appropriateness of existing principles and structures need to be re-examined.

“Learning centred approaches to technology-enabled learning can empower learners and leverage good learning experiences that have not been possible previously. Technology often offers valuable tools for other building blocks in effective learning environments, including personalisation, cooperative learning, managing formative assessment, and many inquiry-based methods.”

OECD, (2012). The nature of learning using research to inspire practice: Practitioner guide

The impact of new technologies in supporting effective teaching and learning is “heavily dependent on educators’ abilities to see the affordances and capacities of ICT in relation to the underpinning themes for learning for the 21st century”.  

Bolstad & Gilbert (2006). Supporting future-oriented learning & teaching – A New Zealand perspective

It’s no longer about tools, or even about e-learning

Whether you are working on a comprehensive plan for digital technologies, or one particular issue, these key concepts should underpin your thinking:

  • Always start with your purpose and principles.
  • Link your planning to teaching and impact on learners.
  • Champion inquiry and innovation.
  • Planning needs to be informed by research and data.
  • Ensure a schoolwide commitment to continual professional growth.

“The mere presence of technology in the form of computers or iPads in a school or as mobile phones in the pockets of learners is not by itself sufficient and their application needs to be learning-centred, not technology-driven.”

Mayer, R. E. (2010). Learning with Technology in Dumont H., Istance, D. and Benavides, F., (eds.), The Nature of Learning, Centre for Educational Research and Innovation, OECD publishing, pp. 179-196 .

Clearly articulate your purpose and principles

The Golden Circle model  (pp 5-9) re-enforces the need to start your planning by focusing on the purpose and principles driving your school’s teaching and learning.  It is tricky to decide on what should be done if the "why" and "how" are not explicit. Only when your school can clearly articulate its purpose and principles should the decisions about "what to do" with digital technology be addressed.

In expanding the concept of “educative purpose”, spend time considering Julia Atkin’s two probing questions:

  • What is it powerful for our students to be learning now and for the future?
  • What does powerful learning and therefore powerful teaching look like?
Education design and development

Image source: Julia Atkin

Agree the purpose, values, and beliefs that underpin how you work as a learning community

Before planning how digital technologies can be deployed to serve your core principles, you must agree the educative purpose, values, and beliefs that underpin how you work as a learning community. This guide assumes that your school already has, or is working on, its vision for teaching and learning before you focus on the management of digital technologies.

More information »
Link your planning for digital technologies to teaching and learning

Planning your digital technologies journey is inextricably linked to your planning for teaching and learning.

The nature of learning using research to inspire practice: Practitioner guide , (OECD, 2012) outlines core messages and seven principles of learning driving a rethink of what is taught, how it is taught, and how learning is assessed. Using these principles to underpin your vision for digital technologies helps create an imperative that teachers who want the best for their students can understand.

These principles are implicit in both The New Zealand Curriculum  and Te Marautanga o Aotearoa .

Achieving successful innovation requires strong leadership and a disciplined approach. It should flow from a school-wide commitment to inquiry  and evidenced-based research. It should be guided by proven frameworks such as the Spirals of Inquiry  and use tools such as Design Thinking for Education .

Effective leadership for supporting innovation includes leadership that:

  • is open to new ideas
  • is prepared to allow distributed leadership in areas of specialisation and expertise
  • builds trust and gives confidence to staff members who are trying new practices
  • ensures any risks associated with changes to practice are identified and managed
  • provides sponsorship and is prepared to commit resources.

Victorian State Government Department of Education and Training

Schools need to:

  • inspire their school community with the big picture vision
  • provide an enabling digital infrastructure
  • improve teacher capability to understand the “Why” and “How”
  • support inquiry and innovation.

Bolstad, R. & Gilbert, J. (2006). Creating digital age learners through school ICT projects: What can the Tech Angels project teach us? NZCER

Without teachers being supported to try new strategies and interventions your system will struggle to achieve transformative changes in classroom practices.

Digital capacity aligned to purpose

Image source: Charles Newton representing ideas from Bolstad & Gilbert 2006

“Evaluation of projects has shown that strong leadership that helps to align an organisation’s culture, capability and connections will enhance the innovative potential of education practitioners."

Victorian State Government Department of Education and Training

More information »
Ensure a schoolwide commitment to continual professional growth

Inspire a school-wide commitment to continual professional growth and be prepared to challenge aspects of teacher culture that do not contribute to improved teaching and learning. Adopting an inquiry framework such as the Spiral of Inquiry  helps achieve this. Professional inquiries need to be informed by research and examples of emerging effective teaching. Inquiries must be underpinned by the increased use of student achievement data to identify challenges and monitor progress.

Charles Newton, former principal, discusses a number of models to support principals with strategic thinking for digital technologies.

Planning to lead technological innovation is all about “weaving the strands” of educational endeavour to ensure digital technologies support and inspire powerful teaching and learning. No longer just focusing on infrastructure and tools, your digital technologies action plan is now integral to building your school’s highly effective pedagogy and future-orientated learning capacity

Develop a thoughtful strategy for gathering and synthesising information that enables you to answer the reflective questions this guide poses. This should include:

  • reading up-to-date research
  • talking to members of your school and wider community
  • visiting schools and talking to other educators
  • attending seminars and conferences
  • connecting, face to face and virtually, with professional learning networks (PLNs).

Look at what statistical and anecdotal data is telling you about your school so that you know where you are now and can envisage the improvement required to achieve your vision. Tools such as the e-Learning Planning Framework (eLPF)  and the Māori Medium e-Learning Planning Framework (MMeLPF)  are designed to assist with this.

More information »
  • Teacher inquiry  – an effective cycle of reflection and review ensures your learning will be linked to evidence of impact.
  • School Evaluation Indicators  – self review in schools plays an important role in promoting achievement, and in school improvement and development.

The successful deployment of digital technologies requires cohesive strategic thinking that is able to meet two of Michael Fullan's (2002)  challenges:

  • achieving “simplexity” – identifying the core factors that must be included in your plan (the simple part) and then ensuring that these gel (the complex part)
  • ensuring “systemness” – everyone works to improve the learning of each and every student across the school.

Deep learning, systemness, and leadership form a triangle of success that underpins an effective educational system.

With that in mind, this guide helps mesh together your planning for each of these eight essential components to ensure digital technologies support a highly effective learning environment.

Weaving the strands

The senior leadership team at Hampden Street School explain how their digital technologies plan supports their strategic plan in terms of planning for, developing, and utilising digital technologies to support learning and teaching. This has been a long and ongoing journey of development for them. Key to their success is commitment to their pedagogy.

More information »

Planning to ensure digital technologies support effective learning – “Weaving the strands”

Consider these eight essential planning strands as you develop your action plan for using digital technologies to support a highly effective learning environment. 

Using the roadmap worksheet to help you plan
  • The Roadmap worksheet is an interactive PDF.
  • You must open The Roadmap worksheet using Adobe Reader to be able to save your work on the PDF.
  • If you are using an iPad, you will need to use a PDF reader app to open, type into, and save the PDF.
The Roadmap Worksheet.pdf (PDF, 129.18 kB)
Supporting templates

School leaders championing a coherent and collaborative strategy ensure digital technologies serve effective pedagogy to raise achievement for all students.

Key principles

Key principles

Leading transformation requires:

  • developing a coherent understanding of the 21st century imperatives
  • articulating a compelling vision, principles, and purpose
  • cultivating a diverse and collaborative team
  • being informed by data, research, and sound practice
  • building change management capacity
  • ensuring robust planning, implementation, monitoring, and evaluation.

21st Century imperatives

Three key imperatives to consider in your strategic planning are the need to:

  1. respond to the impact of the digital environment – it is fundamentally redefining the way we work, learn, and play
  2. understand the rapid advances in the science of learning and apply these to our practice
  3. take advantage of unprecedented opportunities to heighten the impact of teaching and learning that the digital environment now offers.

Rethink systems and teaching approaches to meet these demands and take advantage of the opportunities offered by the digital environment to enhance teaching and learning.

Plan how you will engage school leaders, teachers, and your communities to continuously evaluate what students need to know and the competencies they must develop.

More information »

Develop a vision collaboratively

Successful strategies are developed by collaborative teams  under shared, informed leadership.

Principals have a key role in:

  • understanding and connecting others to the “big-picture” trends in digital technologies and education
  • articulating a compelling vision of how digital technologies will enhance the values, principles, and practices that underpin your school’s educative purpose, and serve effective teaching and learning in the classroom.

When co-constructing the vision and plan for digital technologies:

  • involve teachers and students
  • engage your board, parents, whānau, and community.

This strengthens your deliberations and helps ensure the school community understand how the digital imperative is shaping education which helps engender greater buy-in.

Become a formative data-rich school

As part of evidence-based leadership  of a formative data-rich school, you need to regularly review your progress using current data. Tools such as the eLPF  and MMeLPF  provide a snapshot of your progress and useful resources to help discussing the “where to next”. Goals should be prioritised and informed by:

  • research
  • emerging effective practices
  • your assessment data
  • feedback from learners and their families, and your community.

Build change management capacity

Building your team’s change management capacity  is critical, as is accessing an external critical friend, mentoring, and expert help. Comprehensive, cohesive, and robust planning is essential – steady, deliberate and not too fast!

Implementing your context-appropriate strategy requires:

  • setting priorities
  • trialling initiatives
  • staging rollouts
  • allocating resources
  • monitoring progress.

Innovate, trial, monitor, and evaluate

Trial strategies and interventions as part of an inquiry mindset and a willingness to support innovation. Monitor and evaluate these to identify whether they are making a difference to student achievement.

Reflective questions

Reflective questions

As a leadership team do we understand the C21st imperatives? Can we all clearly articulate our educative purpose and a compelling vision for effective teaching and learning meeting our students’ current and future needs? Not yet Started Yes
Is there distributed leadership across a strong collaborative team, that includes student and whānau voice, that is orchestrating an effective response to the digital imperative? Not yet Started Yes
Based on plotting our present position against the eLPF and other data, does our school have a clear strategy that ensures digital technologies are integral to our broader strategic direction? Not yet Started Yes
Do we have good change management expertise across our team? Are we seeking appropriate external support where we need help to develop and implement a robust plan? Not yet Started Yes
Are we trialling strategies and interventions, and evaluating their impact on student learning? Not yet Started Yes

Teachers, students, whānau, and the community are informed and active partners in planning for and implementing an inclusive digital technologies strategy.

Key principles
Key principles

Genuine learning partnerships require:

  • fully engaging teachers in your planning discussions
  • listening to, and acting on, student voice
  • engaging parents and whānau in their children’s learning
  • creating a genuine curriculum partnership with whānau and community
  • leveraging collaborative and connected synergies.

Engage with teachers

Teachers need:

  • opportunities to feed their classroom knowledge and experiences into leadership decision-making
  • regular opportunities to identify what technological infrastructure and capacity they require to deliver the truly powerful teaching and learning your students need
  • to be strong role models of beneficial and ethical online learning behaviours.

Engage with students

Student voice is incredibly valuable because they are:

  • increasingly experienced users of technology
  • recipients of teaching enhanced by digital technologies
  • able to articulate the contribution that this is making to their learning in and out of school.

A number of schools are actively seeking feedback:

  • through regular surveys
  • by establishing student reference groups
  • by including students in planning teams.

Pakuranga College principal Michael Williams explains, “The type of learning students are doing is changing. They are more authentic and aligned to the real world. Learning has become much more collaborative and students are more engaged."

Engage with your community

Beyond the classroom your school needs to enter a genuine partnership with your community  about and through digital technologies.

Parents and whānau are important because:

  • their engagement in their child’s learning has been shown to lift achievement
  • formal learning is increasingly happening beyond the classroom as well as at school.

This requires your school to think about how you can raise awareness and empower parents to support their children’s learning.

Engage with your community around your rationale for innovative learning practices and a future-orientated curriculum. They need to understand your thinking to help ensure their commitment There will be useful community resources and expertise that you could tap into to support learning programmes. There will be opportunities to leverage useful school community collaborations and partnerships with local business.

Hampden Street School has built a very successful partnership with parents and their local community. Parents share how the school’s open door approach, as they planned and developed their innovative learning environment, gave them confidence that their children’s learning needs were being met.

Work with other schools

Working with other schools can be incredibly valuable as we move into an increasingly connected and collaborative environment that accepts lateral accountability (i.e. the whole community accepts responsibility for each student’s progress and each teacher’s practice). These connections can be face-to-face and virtual. A growing number of schools are starting to investigate synergies around sharing teaching and collaborative access to technologies, professional development and  teaching and learning strategies. The benefits of collaboration are being formalised through the IES Communities of Learning programme and the Virtual Learning Network Community’s online learning programme .

More information »
Reflective questions

Reflective questions

Are we engaging teachers in our planning discussions, listening to their classroom experiences with digital technologies, and understanding their needs? Not yet Started Yes
Do we engage students in our planning discussions, listening to their experiences with technology, and understanding their learning needs? Not yet Started Yes
Are we encouraging and supporting our parents and whānau to develop the knowledge, and competencies required for them to be willing and able partners in the digital environment? Not yet Started Yes
Are we looking to benefit from the involvement of parents, business, and wider communities? Not yet Started Yes
Are we actively seeking to work collaboratively with other schools to leverage synergies made possible by digital technologies? Not yet Started Yes

Powerful learning-centred, personalised, agentic practices instill foundational knowledge while offering students opportunities to actively construct their own learning in collaboration with others.

Key principles
Key principles

Powerful pedagogy is:

  • learning-centred, personalised, and agentic
  • informed by research and emerging best practice
  • enhanced by the authentic use of digital technologies
  • underpinned by connected, culturally responsive, and inclusive practices
  • informed by a range of information about student achievement and well-being.

Research and emerging best practice

As rapid advances in the science of learning “underscores the importance of rethinking what is taught, how it is taught, and how learning is assessed” (Dumont et al , 2012), you must ensure teaching is grounded in research-based evidence and informed by emerging effective practice. Working together, leadership teams and teachers need to identify the key beliefs, principles, and practices that underpin effective teaching and learning in your school – and the role that digital technologies will play in enhancing these.

Powerful learning is learner-centred, personalised, and agentic

There is an emerging consensus that powerful learning is learner-centred, personalised, and agentic. Learning-centred teaching strategies can help leverage the authentic use of digital technologies to:

  • empower learners
  • support cooperative learning
  • enable inquiry-based strategies
  • manage formative assessment.

Social media can be used to support:

More information »
  • Software for learning – Examples of classroom learning demonstrating the effective integration of digital technologies to raise student learning.

Authentic use of digital technologies

Key elements of effective teaching are outlined in the Effective pedagogy section of The New Zealand Curriculum . Given the social nature of learning and the increasing opportunities to connect globally, students need opportunities to learn, create, and share with their peers – to actively construct their own knowledge in collaboration with others face-to-face and online. As learning experiences should demand hard work and challenge, students should experience using digital technologies to access expertise from a range of educators and their more knowledgeable others (MKOs) – adults or peers who can support learning because they have a better understanding of a task or concept.

Culturally responsive and inclusive practices

Emotions are integral to effective learning, as is recognising individual differences. This requires teaching based on an inclusive pedagogy that is culturally responsive and focused on including all students in learning. Digital technologies provide flexible options to support teaching and learning that is more engaging and offers multiple and flexible options for both presenting content and the creation and demonstration of learning.

More information » 

Student assessment data

Digital technologies can help drive formative, data rich, and research-informed schools. Student Management Systems (SMS) data can be used to monitor both individual and group performance and so assist learners and teachers. Emerging assessment, learning analytics, and needs analysis processes can help your school:

  • gather data about student progress through tools such as e-asTTle and PacT
  • analyse and understand data trends
  • keep families informed through on-line parent portals.
  • better understand the process of learning.
More information »
  • Assessment – Information and school stories to support you with selecting, setting up, and using e-learning tools to easily gather and share assessment information in ways that advance the learning of students.
Reflective questions

Reflective questions

Is our school using the emerging research around effective teaching and learning to inform how we will use digital technologies authentically?  Not yet Started Yes
Do our programmes support inquiry-based and co-constructed learning? Not yet Started Yes
Do our teachers use a range of digital opportunities to increase students’ motivation and engagement? Not yet Started Yes
Do our students experience learning that is learner-centred, agentic, and personalised, including opportunities to participate, create, publish and share collaboratively with their peers and others online? Not yet Started Yes
Do we offer students opportunities to actively construct their own knowledge in collaboration with others – and to access experience from a wide range of “More Knowledgeable Others”? Not yet Started Yes
Are we exploring how digital technology can help gather and use formative assessment to improve learning and inform parents? Not yet Started Yes

A purposeful and authentic curriculum provides powerful learning that meets students’ present and future needs.

Key principles
Key principles

Our curriculum needs to be:

  • emphasising what is powerful for students to learn
  • reflecting the changing nature of essential knowledge
  • focusing on both acquiring and using knowledge effectively
  • broadening the scope and authenticity of learning
  • embedding the development of essential digital fluencies .

Powerful to learn

What is powerful for our students to learn now and for their future?

In an increasingly digital world, we need to be asking – “What is powerful for our students to learn now and for their future? We need to be educating knowledgeable, resourceful, and adaptable people who know how to act when they're faced with situations for which they are not specifically prepared – young people who can solve the world’s 'wicked' issues. This will require both foundational knowledge and the ability to connect, to network, and to collaborate – and to work across disciplines.” Bolstad and Gilbert (2006) .

We need to ensure our delivery of the values, principles, key competencies, and intent of The New Zealand Curriculum and Te Marautanga o Aotearoa acknowledge this challenge. Consideration should be given to how your curriculum will support learners to develop the knowledge and competencies needed to thrive in digital environments.

Changing nature of essential knowledge

“There is no question that state of the art knowledge in a discipline will always remain important. Innovative and creative people generally have specialised skills in a field of knowledge or a practice."

OECD (2015), Schooling redesigned: Towards innovative learning systems

Disciplinary knowledge remains as important as ever. However, as a result of the impact of digital technologies, how this knowledge is accessed, represented, and created is rapidly changing to the point that understanding the use of digital technologies is becoming essential foundational knowledge for both traditional and emerging disciplines.

Digital literacy has become foundational knowledge in its own right. The unprecedented impact of the Internet and digital media presents a whole new environment, which the 21st century citizen must learn to navigate successfully.

More information »

Using knowledge effectively

The future depends on people who have deep knowledge of more than one discipline and the ability to see connections between these disciplines. We see this with the emergence of new specialists such as bio-technologists, computational political scientists, and social physicists .    

In response, Bolstad and Gilbert (2006)  suggest, our curriculum must equip young people to be able to synthesise and apply existing and newly created knowledge to solve complex problems, often in cross-disciplinary and collaborative settings.

“The world no longer rewards people just for what they know – but increasingly for what they can do with what they know. Education is becoming more about ways of thinking, involving creativity, critical thinking, problem solving and decision making; including the capacity to recognise and exploit the potential of new technologies and, last but not least, about the social and emotional skills that help people live and work together.”

OECD (2015), Schooling redesigned: Towards innovative learning systems

More information »

Authentic learning

Increasingly prominent in future-orientated learning discussions, and implicit in The New Zealand Curriculum , is the need for learning to be authentic. Your school curriculum must provide authentic learning contexts that promote “horizontal connectedness ” and engage students’ interest and prior knowledge. As the ability to integrate and synthesise information across subject areas is a key 21st century competency, a number of schools are introducing specific time for students to pursue their passions. These often take the form of cross-curricular student led projects.

School examples: 

Digital technologies play an increasingly important role because they enhance the curriculum and pedagogy; making it more efficient, accessible, and enjoyable for teachers and students, and more appealing to digital-generation learners (Bolstad & Gilbert, 2006).

More information »

Digital fluency

Students need a range of curriculum opportunities to develop their digital fluency

Your school curriculum needs to emphasise digital competencies that embrace the foundational knowledge, capabilities, and values essential to participate fluently in an increasingly digital world.

Technologies have changed the mode, scope, scale, and reach of communication and collaboration. The ease of communicating with diverse groups across the world requires heightened ethical, cultural, and emotional awareness to foster meaningful interactions and relationships. Students need a range of authentic curriculum opportunities to develop their digital fluency in this environment.

Reflective questions

Reflective questions

Are we discussing what it’s now powerful for our students to be learning? Are we re-evaluating what constitutes essential knowledge in the digital age? Not yet Started Yes
Are we helping students build the competencies and dispositions to use their knowledge to solve complex problems, often in cross-disciplinary and collaborative settings? Not yet Started Yes
Are digital technologies enabling students to experience authentic learning contexts that engage their interest and prior knowledge? Not yet Started Yes
Is there a clear and consistent understanding of the digital knowledge, competencies and confidence students need to acquire? Do they have opportunities to develop this digital fluency through their curriculum? Not yet Started Yes
Are students experiencing opportunities to communicate with diverse groups online and so foster the ability to sustain meaningful virtual interactions and relationships? Not yet Started Yes

Commit to supporting teachers as they continue to refine and develop effective teaching practices by promoting formal and informal networking, sharing, and collaborating.

Key principles
Key principles

Building teacher capacity requires:

  • a commitment to supporting continuous professional growth
  • adopting a collaborative “teaching as inquiry” mindset and evaluative framework
  • developing internal expertise in effective pedagogy and coaching
  • ensuring a comprehensive and inclusive professional learning and development (PLD) programme
  • support for innovation and risk taking.

Professional growth

Key to building your teachers’ capacity to facilitate authentic learning experiences enhanced by digital technologies is fostering a commitment to continuous professional improvement. Teachers can support each other in a collaborative culture that values high quality formal and informal professional learning.

Leadership must promote teachers’ efficacy, agency, and collective capacity to inquire into their practice. Innovative teaching practices flourish when active teacher collaboration focuses on:

  • peer support in practising and researching new teaching methods
  • sharing information from learner feedback and assessment.

Align professional learning with current pedagogical approaches. Focus on activities directly linked to the curriculum to utilise teachers’ practical insights into what works and theoretical insight into why.

Pakuranga College principal, Michael Williams describes their intensive PLD programme. Students have a late start every Friday morning with that time dedicated to professional learning. Teachers have time and support to focus on their inquiries, which are currently based on creating better learning opportunities for students using digital technologies as a tool to support this.

More information »

Teaching as inquiry

Your school might adopt an inquiry framework such as Teaching as inquiry or Spiral of inquiry.  When investigating problems of practice, evidence from research, formative, and summative assessment data should be used as a catalyst to engage and then begin to unpack teachers’ often strongly held beliefs about curriculum teaching and learning. 

Coaching and mentoring

Coaching and mentoring have an important role to play in gathering, evaluating, and disseminating research and data and in challenging established aspects of teacher culture that do not contribute to improved outcomes for students.

More information »

Support professional learning and development

Sustainable and cost-effective professional development requires developing in-school expertise and participation in connected communities of schools and peers. It is also essential that individual teachers are encouraged to become “connected learners” using technology and their professional learning networks to be actively engaged in local and global communities of practice.
 
Because successfully implemented PLD requires significant resources to support educators as they take on new and expanded roles, it’s important to:

  • build and sustain internal leadership capacity and develop processes for identifying staff professional learning strengths and needs
  • monitor the effectiveness of your strategies.

Support innovation and risk taking

School leadership needs to foster an environment that encourages your teachers to seek innovative and creative strategies with a strong focus on improving outcomes for learners. Enable them to take informed risks without fear of failure. This requires recognising, celebrating, and rewarding accomplishments in ways that sustain positive change.

Reflective questions

Reflective questions

Are our professional practices collaborative and underpinned by a drive for continuous improvement fostered by a teaching as inquiry-based approach such as Spirals of Inquiry? Not yet Started Yes
How, and to what extent, do teachers inquire into their use of future-focused learning? Is this process informed by data? Not yet Started Yes

Do we have a comprehensive plan for developing teachers’ knowledge, competencies, and confidence to use a range of digital technologies effectively in their teaching?

How do we ensure that this is addressing the needs of all our staff?

Not yet Started Yes
Do we have a strategy to develop internal expertise in effective pedagogy and coaching? Not yet Started Yes
Do teachers use their PLNs and online communities of practice to share and reflect on their practice and strengthen collegial support? Not yet Started Yes
Are we fostering an environment that supports our teachers to explore innovative ways to achieve the principles of future-focused learning? Not yet Started Yes

Rethink the different components, relationships, partnerships, and principles integral to learning environments to support more flexible and personalised learning.

Key principles
Key principles

Innovative learning environments:

  • rethink the industrial model constraints
  • redefine and reallocate teachers and educators
  • reallocate the time and place of learning
  • rethink sites and structures
  • increase the flexibility of spaces and resources so all learners can be successful.

Defining an ILE

A learning environment is the complete physical, social, and pedagogical context in which learning occurs. “An innovative learning environment (ILE) is one that is capable of evolving and adapting as educational practices evolve and change – thus remaining future focused,” Ministry of Education .

These strongly held learning principles must underpin your planning for PLD, the physical environment, learning activities, and building relationships:

  • place learners at the centre
  • learning is social in nature
  • emotions are integral to learning
  • recognise individual differences
  • stretch all students
  • assess for learning with a strong emphasis on formative feedback
  • building horizontal connections across learning activities and subjects, both in and out of school.

OECD, (2012). The nature of learning using research to inspire practice: Practitioner guide

Key considerations when planning changes

Consider how the digital environment allows you to reshape the different components, relationships, partnerships, and principles integral to learning.  How does the increasing ubiquity, connectivity and mobility of digital technologies help you:  

  • develop innovative pedagogy and assessment
  • rethink critical elements such as student groupings, school timetables, and the school day
  • broaden the range of educators supporting students
  • re-allocate teachers and educators across groups of students in collaborating teams
  • rethink the types of space necessary for increasingly flexible and personalised learning
  • remove barriers to learning and include all students.
  • seek opportunities for beneficial collaboration with other schools?

Your school’s planning for innovative learning environments should reflect the types of interactions that are to be supported. Having established your pedagogical ambitions, plan to provide the infrastructure and teacher capability needed to fully utilise your selected digital technologies.

More information »
Reflective questions

Reflective questions

In what ways, and to what extent, is our strategic thinking reworking key elements of the learning environment, such as the allocation of time, spaces, places, and people? Not yet Started Yes
Have we thought about how digital technologies are redefining what constitutes a school, a classroom and the school day, and considered the implications? Not yet Started Yes
When reviewing our timetabling of learning and allocation of time to activities, are we thinking how we group students and how we deploy teachers and other educators? Not yet Started Yes

Have we thought:

  • how digital technologies will help us achieve a more effective learning environment?
  • how our environment can be improved to harness the potential of digital technologies?
Not yet Started Yes
Does our planning for new buildings and modernising teaching/learning spaces leverage digital technologies? Are we removing barriers so all can participate? Not yet Started Yes

The effective use of digital technologies supported by infrastructure and equipment is tailored to serve future-orientated learning and administration needs.

Key principles
Key principles

Your infrastructure:

  • must serve teaching, learning, and assessment
  • must provide reliable, safe, and ubiquitous connectivity
  • needs to ensure equitable accessibility to tools, services, and data while respecting user privacy
  • needs to accommodate an increasing range of devices
  • needs effective technical management.

e-Learning lead teacher, John O’Regan describes the important considerations for Hampden Street School to create reliable systems that meet the needs of their BYOD programme.

Developing and maintaining a reliable, cost-effective, and sustainable infrastructure that serves your school’s teaching, learning, and assessment while remaining largely invisible to users is a significant challenge.

Reliable, safe, and ubiquitous connectivity

To sustain bandwidth for intensive learning, your infrastructure needs to include:

  • SNUP standard cabling and switches and industry-standard wifi supported by UFB
  • firewalling and filtering either provided at no direct cost by N4L or purchased from other providers.

Cloud storage

For your operation’s storage and backup, servers can either be onsite or in the cloud. In an increasingly browser-based and cloud environment, you also have opportunities to access ICT infrastructure as a utility provided by others.

Integrating different cloud services so that they are easy for people to use poses significant management challenges, such as how to provide identity and access management (IAM) and single sign-on (SSO). Your system must be able to balance the need to protect privacy and personal information while still ensuring that there is easy access to the tools, services, and data teachers and learners need to optimise learning.

More information »

Accommodate an increasing range of devices

In providing equitable access to appropriate equipment including devices fit for age, stage, and intentions, it is increasingly likely that access to a selection of differing devices will be required through a combination of school provision and/or BYOD. This may be 1:1 or many to one as teachers and students start bringing smartphones, tablets, laptops, and other future devices to school.

More information »

Effective technical management

You will need to integrate your planning and budgeting for management, maintenance, procurement, and renewals into your wider school priorities. Effective technical support encompasses:

  • fixing broken devices and connections
  • maintaining all digital technologies
  • planning for future problems
  • managing your assets.

All your digital technology needs to work all the time with reliable back-ups available in case of disaster.

It is highly recommended that your school always peer-reviews important digital technology procurement processes and decisions, and reviews the digital infrastructure  every year.

e-Learning lead teacher, John O’Regan describes Hampden Street School's system for technical support. Key to its success is the connection between the technician, who is also a teacher, and the staff. A clear understanding of student and teacher requirements ensures the infrastructure is built and supported to meet the needs of those using it.

More information »
Reflective questions

Reflective questions

Do we have an appropriately specified, reliable, and sustainable ICT infrastructure, including SNUP, UFB, and industry-standard wireless, that serves our vision for teaching and learning? Not yet Started Yes
Are we looking to fully leverage government initiatives to secure cost-effective connectivity, firewalling, filtering, and other digital technologies? Not yet Started Yes
Are we moving towards seeing ICT as a utility and taking advantage the economies of scale offered by the cloud for infrastructure provision? Not yet Started Yes
Are we ensuring our teachers and students have access to an appropriate suite of equipment and devices? Not yet Started Yes
How does our 3-5 year planning and budgeting for infrastructure management, maintenance, and procurement align with our school’s overarching strategic direction? Not yet Started Yes
Have we reviewed the performance and cost effectiveness of our current arrangements for technical support? Are our decision makers seeking advice and peer review? Not yet Started Yes

Teachers and students have ubiquitous access to a coherent set of simple-to-use applications, resources, services, and support.

Key principles
Key principles

Cohesive digital services:

  • need to assemble a coherent environment
  • must be sufficiently flexible to meet the needs of all users
  • need to provide increasing interoperability and seamlessness
  • must protect your users’ privacy, safety, and data
  • need appropriate policies, procedures, and support.

Coherent digital environment

Your school needs to assemble a coherent digital environment that serves teaching and learning. Along with your student management system (SMS), the key components could be:

  • a productivity suite such as Google Apps for Education (GAFE) or Microsoft Office 365, and a teacher dashboard.
  • learning management system (LMS)
  • parent portal
  • e-portfolio.

Your school may also be using a library package and assessment tools such as e-asTTle and PaCT . Look to increase the functionality of your digital environment through the efficient use of supporting digital services and consider incorporating the beneficial use of social media elements.

More information »
  • Social software  – Snapshots of learning from schools using social software such as Skype and Blogger.
  • Software for learning  – Classroom examples demonstrating effective integration of digital technologies for learning.

Increasing flexibility and interoperability

This environment must be able to accommodate a range of users and their differing requirements.

To help ensure efficiency, cohesion, and cost effectiveness, leverage the emerging web-enabled, browser-based Software as a Service (SaaS) environment. However, if you are accessing a range of cloud-based services, this environment brings challenges in terms of:

  • managing user identity and access management (IAM)
  • password management
  • single sign-on (SSO)
  • the provisioning of cloud-based applications.

You may wish to consider services that can help you manage this.

Protecting the privacy, safety, and data of your users

Policies around safety, security, data management, and a dedicated curriculum programme to foster digital citizenship are crucial to ensure that the school has plans in place to address components of safe, digital environments. Appropriate, user-friendly policies and procedures that are understood and adhered to will encourage appropriate and efficient use of technologies.

Training and support

The use of digital technologies will only be successful when users are appropriately skilled. Ensure adequate training and preparation so all teachers are able and willing to use appropriate aspects of the infrastructure effectively, evaluate when approaches are effective, and modify these when they are not.
 
Develop a co-ordinated strategy, which includes just-in-time technical services and support for teachers and students. You should adopt a collaborative, learning-focused approach to providing effective technical support that meets the needs of everyone in the school.

More information »
Reflective questions

Reflective questions

Has our school assembled a coherent digital environment that supports our learning, teaching, assessment, and administration needs? Not yet Started Yes
Can all our teachers and students personalise the applications, resources and services to meet their differing requirements. Not yet Started Yes
Do we have a strategy to increase accessibility to cloud-based services to broaden learning opportunities? Not yet Started Yes
Do we have the tools to manage our users in this environment? Not yet Started Yes

Do we have appropriate policies and procedures?

How are we addressing the digital safety of staff and students?

Not yet Started Yes
Do we ensure adequate training, professional learning, and preparation so all teachers are able and willing to use appropriate aspects of the infrastructure effectively? Not yet Started Yes
Are we ensuring effective access to the “just-in-time” technical and skills support that our teachers and students need? Not yet Started Yes
Weaving the strands

Key requirements of your digital technologies action plan

Your plan must include:

  • your vision and principles for using digital technologies, aligned to wider school thinking
  • an assessment of where your school is currently – consider: components, relationships, strengths, barriers, initiatives, and collaborations
  • a sense of progression from current to an improved future state
  • specific goals and actions, and how these will be achieved
  • provision for monitoring progress and evaluating impact against expectations.

Using the templates

  • Use The Roadmap worksheet to facilitate your strategic discussions.
The Roadmap Worksheet.pdf (PDF, 129.18 kB)
    • The Roadmap worksheet is an interactive PDF.
    • You must open The Roadmap worksheet using Adobe Reader to be able to save your work on the PDF.
    • If you are using an iPad, you will need to use a PDF reader app to open, type into, and save the PDF.

CLA Advisor, Charles Newton explains how to use the templates as you plan. 

Using The Roadmap worksheet

The Roadmap worksheet provides a visual overview of the key components to consider when planning for digital technologies.

You can download an interactive digital copy, which allows you to record your thoughts on the worksheet or print large paper copies for people to write notes on. If you are using the interactive version, you must open The Roadmap worksheet using Adobe Reader to be able to save your work on the PDF. If you are using an iPad, you will need to use a PDF reader app to open, type into, and save the PDF.

The Roadmap Worksheet.pdf (PDF, 129.18 kB)

Work as a team, and with your stakeholders, to compile your observations in answer to the focus questions on The Roadmap worksheet.

The Eight planning strands  section of the guide explains the scope of these strands. For each strand you need to consider the key principles and their explanation before evaluating your school’s performance against the strand’s reflective questions. Record your observations on The Roadmap worksheet.

Where this evaluation identifies gaps, your team can then investigate these aspects in greater detail using the links to resources in each of the Eight planning strands

During your discussions you will start to identify both broader challenges and specific issues that need to be addressed. It’s important that you record these in the “Emerging goals and actions” box on The Roadmap worksheet.

When seeking input from different groups you may find the Planning conversations framework  helps facilitate useful discussions.

Models for presenting your plan

While there are different ways to present these requirements, you will need to ensure that the “Action Plan” component is prominent.

Larger schools model
  1. Work through The Roadmap worksheet.
    • The Roadmap Worksheet.pdf (PDF, 129.18 kB)
    • Ensure you use Adobe Reader to open the worksheet so that you can save your work. If you are using an iPad, you will need to use an App that allows you to open a PDF.
  2. Complete the “Emerging goals and actions” section on The Roadmap worksheet.
  3. Summarise the information on your Roadmap worksheet on the Roadmap discussion summary  capturing the key features of your stocktake to show how digital technologies support your school’s vision for teaching and learning.
  4. Prioritise your goals and actions in terms of impact and urgency in the Emerging goals and actions section on the Roadmap discussion summary .
  5. The work needed to address or initiate these is expanded in the Goals and actions template .
Smaller schools model
  1. Work on The Roadmap worksheet to compile your observations in answer to the focus questions.
    • The Roadmap Worksheet.pdf (PDF, 129.18 kB)
    • Ensure you use Adobe Reader to open the worksheet so that you can save your work. If you are using an iPad, you will need to use an App that allows you to open a PDF.
  2. Use the Goals and actions template  to detail your “Emerging goals and actions” identified on the The Roadmap worksheet.
Customised template model
  • Develop a customised template that suits the style and needs of your school. Make sure this addresses the suggested key requirements.
Examples based on actual school plans

Presenting your digital technologies plan to your school community

How you choose to describe and present your conclusions and recommendations is up to you. When other staff, the Board, students, parents, and the community read your plan, it must enable them to:

  • see how this aligns with wider school vision and strategic thinking
  • understand the context and rationale underpinning your recommendations
  • know exactly what you intend to achieve and how this will happen.

The format should align with, and leverage, the thinking and concepts that underpin the Eight planning strands .

BYOD – Planning your digital strategy

BYOD – Planning your digital strategy

Michael Williams, principal Pakuranga College, discusses some of the key questions they worked through when developing their digital strategy.

Strategic planning – A collaborative process

Strategic planning – A collaborative process

DP, Billy Merchant describes how the senior leadership team operates using distributed leadership model at Pakuranga College. Decisions are always based on improving student learning.

Professional learning – Teacher inquiry

Professional learning – Teacher inquiry

Pakuranga College principal, Michael Williams describes their intensive PLD programme.

10 tips for success

10 tips for success

CLA Advisor, Charles Newton explains ten key considerations for successful planning.

Professional learning – e-Learning coordinator role

Professional learning – e-Learning coordinator role

Allister Williamson explains his role as e-Learning coordinator at Pakuranga College, which involves overseeing their professional learning programme.

Strategic planning underpinned by pedagogy

Strategic planning underpinned by pedagogy

The senior leadership team at Hampden Street School explain how their e-learning plan supports their strategic plan in terms of planning for, developing, and utilising digital technologies to support learning and teaching. 

Engaging with parents

Engaging with parents

Parents from Hampden Street School share how the school’s open door approach gave them confidence that their children’s learning needs were being met in an innovative learning environment.

Building a reliable infrastructure

Building a reliable infrastructure

John O’Regan, e-Learning lead teacher, describes the important considerations for Hampden Street School to create reliable systems that meet the needs of their BYOD programme.

Introducing the strategic thinking roadmap

Introducing the strategic thinking roadmap

Connected Learning Advisor, Charles Newton explains how to use this guide to support developing your digital technologies action plan. 

Charles Newton

Developing your digital technologies action plan

CLA Advisor, Charles Newton explains how to use the templates as you plan.

Planning for success – Taking your staff with you

Planning for success – Taking your staff with you

Pakuranga College DP, Billy Merchant explains taking staff with you on the e-learning journey is number one. Not all staff will move at the same pace and in the same way so they provide lots of different channels and different avenues for support.

Selecting a device for BYOD

Selecting a device for BYOD

Michael Williams and Billy Merchant from Pakuranga College, explain their change in pedagogy from telling students which device to purchase to being "device agnostic". 

Professional learning – Planning strategically

Professional learning – Planning strategically

Pakuranga College principal, Michael Williams explains their system for PLD. Using their rubrics teachers can identify their strengths and next steps. e-Mentors support teachers with their inquiries into using digital technologies effectively.

Effective technical support systems

Effective technical support systems

John O’Regan, e-Learning lead teacher Hampden Street School, describes their system for providing technical support to staff.

Impact of digital technologies on teacher practice

Impact of digital technologies on teacher practice

Michael Williams Billy Merchant, Pakuranga College, describe how their teaching staff have developed good pedagogy and are more confident in using digital technologies to support learning. 

Strategic planning – Digital technologies supporting effective pedagogy

Strategic planning – Digital technologies supporting effective pedagogy

Pakuranga College’s strategic goal is to provide students with the skills, values, and attitudes they need to be successful now and in the future. Principal, Michael Williams explains how they use digital technologies as a tool to support that goal. 

BYOD - Impact on student learning

BYOD – Impact on student learning

Pakuranga College principal Michael Williams explains, learning has become more collaborative and students are more engaged.

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The Roadmap Worksheet.pdf (PDF, 129.18 kB)

This interactive PDF can be downloaded and typed into or printed out and written on. To save your work, you must use Adobe Reader to open The Roadmap worksheet. If you are using an iPad, you will need to use a PDF reader app to open, type into, and save the PDF.

Roadmap discussion summary

Use this downloadable document with the The Roadmap worksheet. Enter your school’s vision for effective teaching and learning, and the key principles that underpin that vision.

Goals and actions template

A downloadable document for schools to use when creating a digital technologies action plan.

A simple example of planning for digital technologies

A downloadable document for smaller schools to use when developing your schoolwide plan for using digital technologies.

A more in-depth example of planning

A downloadable document for larger schools to use when developing your schoolwide plan for using digital technologies.

Planning to ensure digital technologies support effective learning

A PowerPoint presentation by Charles Newton, introducing this guide and explaining how to use it.

Future-oriented teaching and learning environments and the role of digital technologies in supporting these

A discussion of the trends of future-oriented and innovative practices in New Zealand schools and examples of these trends in action. A Google Doc by Charles Newton, Connected Learning Advisor.

Creating and sustaining innovative learning environments

A summary of Innovative learning environments, Educational research and innovation, OECD (2013).

Procuring digital technologies

An overview of the options available for New Zealand schools as they procure digital technologies. It is intended for use by technology decision-makers in schools.

Managing successful change

This diagram shows all the key components involved in managing successful change.

BYOD and 1:1 Preparedness checklist

A checklist, devised by the CLA, to help you reflect on your school’s readiness for implementing BYOD or 1:1 devices.

What knowledge is of most worth: Teacher knowledge for 21st century learning

A summary of the analysis on 21st century knowledge frameworks undertaken by Kereluik, K., Mishra, P., Fahnoe, C., & Terry, L. (2013) What knowledge is of most worth: Teacher knowledge for 21st Century learning. Journal of Digital Learning in Teacher Education, v29 n4 p127-140  

ICT Budgeting for digital technologies in your school

21 Tips to save you money and frustration.

Providing effective technical support for staff and students

Information to support schools with establishing clear and effective systems to address technical and user problems, or suggestions for improvements.

e-Learning Planning Framework

The e-Learning Planning Framework (eLPF) and Māori-medium eLPF are tools to help schools and teachers reflect on, and evaluate, their e-learning capability. The eLPF is intended to support regular self-review and subsequent improvement of e-learning skills and knowledge, in ways that reflect our bicultural heritage within a multicultural context.

Inclusive classrooms

Inclusive pedagogy is focused on including all students in learning. The aim is to bring students together and build a classroom community where every child is valued and is able to reach their potential. This section of the Enabling e-Learning website provides information and examples of how digital technologies can be used to support inclusive practices.

Innovative learning environments

Information, school stories, and examples to support teachers and school leaders with developing an innovative learning environment that supports strengths-based teaching.

Assessment

Information and examples of how digital technologies can be used to enable you to easily gather and share assessment information in ways that advance the learning of students.

Connected Learning Advisory

The Connected Learning Advisory is a free service for schools and kura offering consistent, unbiased advice on integrating digital technologies with learning so they can get the best results for their students and communities. Schools can contact the advisory via online form or by phone.

Teacher inquiry into e-learning

An effective cycle of reflection and review ensures your learning will be linked to evidence of impact.

Software for learning

Examples of classroom learning demonstrating the effective integration of digital technologies to raise student learning.

TED: Simon Sinek — The Golden Circle

Simon Sinek explains the Golden Circle in this YouTube clip from a TED talk.

Expansive Education — Bill Lucas and Guy Claxton

Professors Bill Lucas and Guy Claxton discuss what expansive education is and how can teachers use inquiry to setup a trial for change.

Thinking e-strategically

Charles Newton, former principal, discusses a number of models to support principals with strategic thinking for digital technologies.

Laying the foundations for coaching and mentoring

Principal Kevin Choromanski turned to the work of Professor Jan Robertson to lift achievement at Pomaria School. Professor Robertson has helped the school to develop a coaching and mentoring programme that sees everyone as a leader and a learner. This film on NZC Online is one of a series, designed to provide support and inspiration to schools that are in the process of reviewing their own school curriculum.

Professional learning and appraisal at ASHS

Albany Senior High School outline their process for professional inquiry on Wiki Educator.

New pedagogies

This section of the New Pedagogies for Deep Learning website explains the four elements: learning partnerships, pedagogical practices, learning environments, and leveraging digital which combine to mobilise deep learning.

Building community relationships

Leading the school community, building partnerships, consulting with communities, involving parents, families and whānau are key to building community relationships. The Educational Leaders website provides resources expanding each of these four components.

A framework for transforming learning in schools: Innovation and the spiral of inquiry

A summary of Timperley, Kaser, and Halbert’s Spirals of Inquiry paper on Educational Leaders. Download the full research paper from here.

Design thinking for educators

Design thinking for educators is creative process that helps you design meaningful solutions in the classroom, at your school, and in your community. The Design Thinking Toolkit provides you with instructions to explore Design Thinking.

School Evaluation Indicators

Information about the different stages and types of self review, self-review processes, and what highly effective self review looks like from ERO.

Evidence-based leadership

Information and resources from the Educational Leaders website to support school leaders with self-review and evaluation processes using student achievement data. These are the basis for sound decision making about and within teaching and learning.

Leading and managing change

Information and resources from the Educational Leaders website to support school leaders with managing change.

Building community relationships

Information and resources from the Educational Leaders website to support school leaders with building partnerships.

Investing in educational success

Information from the Ministry of Education’s website on Investing in Educational Success (IES), a Government initiative aimed at lifting student achievement and offering new career opportunities for teachers and principals.

Inclusive Education – Guides for schools

Practical strategies, suggestions, and resources to support learners with diverse needs.

e-asTTle

This site provides information about and access to the e-asTTle online learning and assessment tool.  

PacT

The Progress and Consistency Tool (PacT) is an online tool that supports teaching and learning.

Mentoring and coaching

Information and resources from the Educational Leaders website to support school leaders with mentoring and coaching by a peer partner.

Rewindable learning

e-Fellow, Emma Watts’ inquiry looked into rewindable learning (flipping the classroom) to engage and inspire reluctant writers. She asks, “How can we crack engagement in deep learning and develop lifelong learners who are confident, connected and actively involved? Can rewindable learning crack engagement in writing? Who should create the rewindable learning? The teacher? The students?”

Trend 1: Learner agency

Derek Wenmoth, CORE Education, explains learner agency. He unpacks the core features of learner agency, implications for teachers and leaders, challenges, and provides examples and links for further learning in this blog post.

What is digital fluency?

A blog post from Karen Melhuish Spencer, CORE Education, explaining digital fluency.

The backchannel: Giving every student a voice in the blended mobile classroom

A backchannel – a digital conversation that runs concurrently with a face-to-face activity – provides students with an outlet to engage in conversation. Beth Holland expands on the benefits of the backchannel in this post on Edutopia

Teach social learning

Vygotsky’s research into social development theory is outlined. Three key themes are: social interaction, the more knowledgeable other (MKO), and the zone of proximal development (ZPD).  

Driving change starts with ignoring advice on how to drive

A review of Michael Fullan’s book on Change Management. It outlines six key ideas for successfully managing change.

OECD. (2015), Schooling redesigned: Towards innovative learning environments, OEDC Publishing, Paris

OECD. (2013), Innovative Learning Environments, Educational Research and Innovation, OECD Publishing, Paris

OECD, (2012), The nature of learning using research to inspire practice: Practitioner guide from the Innovative Learning Environments Project – How can learning sciences inform the design of 21st century learning environments, OECD Publishing, Paris

Mayer, R. E. (2010), Learning with Technology in Dumont H., Istance, D. and Benavides, F., (eds.), The Nature of Learning, Centre for Educational Research and Innovation, OECD publishing, pp. 179-196

Bolstad, R. & Gilbert, J. (2012), Supporting future-oriented learning & teaching — a New Zealand perspective, NZCER

Bolstad, R, & Gilbert, J. (2006), Creating digital age learners through school ICT projects: What can the Tech Angels project teach us? NZCER

Timperly, H., Kaser, L., & Halbert, J. (2014), A framework for transforming learning in schools: Innovation and the spiral of inquiry

Patterson, D. & Rolheiser, C. (2004), Creating a culture of change

An article reviewing successful approaches used by schools in Canada focusing on building a collaborative school culture to support change.

Fullan M. (2011), Learning is the work

In this unpublished paper, Michael Fullan expands on building new collaborative cultures within and across schools in order to build individual and collective capacity to improve instruction linked to student needs and achievement.

Fullan, M. & Langworthy, M. (2014), A rich seam: How new pedagogies find deep learning

This report explains three new forces that are converging improve learning.

  • new pedagogies – from the new learning partnerships that emerge between and among students and teachers when digital tools and resources become pervasive.
  • new change leadership – merges top-down, bottom-up and sideways energies to generate change that is faster and easier than anything seen in past efforts at reform.
  • new system economics – makes the powerful learning tools and resources that accelerate the first two forces more affordable for all.

Fullan, M., Rincon-Gallardo, S., & Hargreaves, A. (2015), Professional capital as accountability. Education Policy Analysis Archives, 23(15)

This paper clarifies the responsibilities of policy makers to create the conditions for an effective system that produces substantial improvements in student learning, strengthens the teaching profession, and provides transparency of results to the public. The article draws on lessons from highly effective school systems in the United States and internationally to argue that the priority for policy makers should be to lead with creating the conditions for internal accountability, that is, the collective responsibility within the teaching profession for the continuous improvement and success of all students.

Kereluik, K., Mishra, P.,  Fahnoe, C., & Terry, L. (2013), What knowledge is of most worth: Teacher knowledge for 21st Century learning. Journal of Digital Learning in Teacher Education, v29 n4 p127-140

Hartman, K. A summary of the book: Start with why by Simon Sinek

Tātaiako: Cultural competencies for teachers of Māori learners

This guide has been produced in response to a number of specific queries from schools. It should not be read as a recommendation or endorsement of any specific product. The Connected Learning Advisory is a Ministry of Education supported service that provides schools with technology information relevant to their queries and does not recommend one product over another.

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